Andrew Denson: Apologizing for Indian Removal in the Civil Rights Era South

In the spring of 1962, legislators in Georgia voted unanimously to repeal a set of anti-Indian laws from the 1820s and 1830s. These laws had sparked the political crisis that led to the Cherokee “Trail of Tears,” the removal of the majority of Cherokees from the Southeast to Indian Territory. Starting in 1828, Georgia had extended its jurisdiction over Cherokee territory, outlawed the Cherokee government, and nullified Cherokee laws in an effort to force tribal leaders to negotiate a removal agreement with the United States. Continue Reading Andrew Denson: Apologizing for Indian Removal in the Civil Rights Era South

Interview: Christopher Teuton on Cherokee Storytelling and the Turtle Island Liars’ Club

I was learning from my elders. This book is shaped by the questions I asked and by what the Liars’ Club wanted to teach me. My methodology in recording and writing the book was guided by a Cherokee way of sharing knowledge, which is that the one with something to learn should watch, listen, and ask questions when it’s appropriate. I think for me and the Liars’ Club the book represents a Cherokee way of doing research in the community and sharing knowledge with the wider community. We hope it provides a model that will inspire others. Continue Reading Interview: Christopher Teuton on Cherokee Storytelling and the Turtle Island Liars’ Club

Excerpt: The House on Diamond Hill, by Tiya Miles

It was lovely, this old plantation house, perched, as it was, atop a hillside. Striking in its grandeur. Alluring in its light. I could almost believe, staring up at the glowing, Palladian window panes, that the year was 1806, that Cherokees still possessed the lands of northern Georgia, that the wealthy Cherokee family who once dwelled in this home would appear at a doorway in waistcoats and bustles. Continue Reading Excerpt: The House on Diamond Hill, by Tiya Miles

Rose Stremlau: History’s Definition of an American Family

The majority of human civilizations across time and place have not organized themselves into nuclear family units based on monogamous, heterosexual coupling. Native North American societies provide hundreds of alternative examples. Continue Reading Rose Stremlau: History’s Definition of an American Family

Sport, Religion, and Native Identity

Michael Zogry, author of Anetso, the Cherokee Ball Game: At the Center of Ceremony and Identity guest blogs over at First Peoples, New Directions today about anetso, the precursor to field lacrosse which blends sport, religious ritual, and cultural identity. An excerpt: Throughout the first decade of the twenty-first century, certain members of the Eastern… Continue Reading Sport, Religion, and Native Identity

“We Are Standing on Beautiful History”

Today we welcome a guest post from Tiya Miles, author of The House on Diamond Hill: A Cherokee Plantation Story. Last weekend she attended a gathering to celebrate the historic plantation home and held a signing event for her new book. Over the course of her day, past and present were juxtaposed in an experience… Continue Reading “We Are Standing on Beautiful History”

National Young Readers Week

Creating lifetime readers is the goal and it’s all thanks to Pizza Hut. Wait, what? That’s right, you read me correctly. National Young Readers Week is an annual event that was co-founded in 1989 by Pizza Hut and the Center for the Book in the Library of Congress. Pizza Hut created The BOOK IT! Program… Continue Reading National Young Readers Week

Books + Free Entertainment = Great Weekend Plans

If you are like me, you look forward to the weekends, but dread spending the annoying amounts of money that usually accompany your weekend entertainment. Well, this weekend, you are in luck.  If you are going to be in or around Chapel Hill this weekend, you MUST check out The North Carolina Literary Festival on… Continue Reading Books + Free Entertainment = Great Weekend Plans

UNC Press books making headlines (and airwaves)

We’ve got lots going on around here! Here’s a quick roundup of ways in which UNC Press books are making waves right now. . . . Patrick Huber’s Linthead Stomp: The Creation of Country Music in the Piedmont South has just earned a starred review from Publishers Weekly. The review states, “With respect and passion,… Continue Reading UNC Press books making headlines (and airwaves)