Category: African American Studies

Juneteenth Reads: Exploring Slavery and Emancipation

Happy Juneteenth! Today we’re celebrating the emancipation of slavery in the US by reflecting on this crucial piece of American history. To help you learn more about the history of slavery and emancipation in the US we’ve compiled a reading list of some must-read titles, but you can also browse our full African American studies list here. Illusions of Emancipation:… Continue Reading Juneteenth Reads: Exploring Slavery and Emancipation

Lynching and Foul Murder: An Excerpt from The Violent World of Broadus Miller

The following is an excerpt from The Violent World of Broadus Miller: A Story of Murder, Lynch Mobs, and Judicial Punishment in the Carolinas by Kevin W. Young, which is available wherever books are sold. “Young offers insight into the day-to-day racism, violence, and fear that permeated the Carolinas. Thoroughly researched and meticulously documented, this gripping narrative is a truly… Continue Reading Lynching and Foul Murder: An Excerpt from The Violent World of Broadus Miller

New This Week

Another week, another selection of new books! Check out the following titles that are now on-sale wherever books are sold. A Guide to North Carolina’s Freshwater Fishes by Bryn Tracy, Fred C. Rohde, Scott Smith, Jesse Bissette, and Gabriela M. Hogue A Southern Gateways Guide A Comprehensive guide to the more than 250 species of freshwater fishes that live in North Carolina waters. Includes: Ascension:… Continue Reading New This Week

Lights, Camera, Biography: The Perfect Book to Read if You’re Planning to Watch Netflix’s “Shirley”

Today, March 22, is the release of the new Netflix film, Shirley, with Regina King starring as Shirley Chisholm—the first Black woman elected to Congress and the first woman and Black major-party(Democratic) presidential candidate. If you’re planning to watch this biopic, you may want to add Shirley Chisholm: Champion of Black Feminist Power Politics by Anastasia C. Curwood, which is… Continue Reading Lights, Camera, Biography: The Perfect Book to Read if You’re Planning to Watch Netflix’s “Shirley”

2024 African American Intellectual History Society Annual Meeting

UNC Press is excited to be exhibiting in-person at the African American Intellectual History Society annual meeting! We hope you’ll stop by our table to say hello to editors Andrew Winters & Dawn Durante and to browse our titles on display. If you can’t join us in-person, you can always visit our virtual booth! CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR FINALISTS FOR THE… Continue Reading 2024 African American Intellectual History Society Annual Meeting

New Books This Week

Check out these new titles that are now available wherever books are sold. And don’t forget that if you want to see everything new this month, you can visit our Hot Off the Press page or sign up for monthly enews to get updates in your inbox every month on new books & other exciting UNC Press news. Being Black in the Ivory: Truth-Telling… Continue Reading New Books This Week

Food As a Weapon: An excerpt from “Food Power Politics”

This week for Black History Month, we’re sharing an excerpt from the introduction of Food Power Politics: The Food Story of the Mississippi Civil Rights Movement by Bobby J. Smith II which was the first book in our Black Food Justice Series. “[Smith] shows how the struggles of the region’s Black communities laid the groundwork for the modern food justice… Continue Reading Food As a Weapon: An excerpt from “Food Power Politics”

Biographies to Read During Black History Month

February is Black History Month and to celebrate we’ve been sharing book excerpts and reading lists of our African American studies titles here on the blog. Black History cannot be understood without taking an individual look at the lived experiences and stories of Black people themselves. As such, we have curated a list of Biographies highlighting the Black experience. Ranging… Continue Reading Biographies to Read During Black History Month

A Douglass Day Reading List

Happy Douglass Day 2024! From DouglassDay.org: Although Frederick Douglass (born circa 1817/1818-died February 20, 1895) never knew his birth date, he chose to celebrate every year on February 14th. We mark this day with a collective action that serves & celebrates Black history. The following UNC Press titles celebrate the incredible accomplishments of Frederick Douglass. Frederick Douglass: America’s Prophet by… Continue Reading A Douglass Day Reading List

Worry about Yourself: An Excerpt from “Eating While Black”

During the second week of Black History Month, enjoy this excerpt of Eating While Black: Food Shaming and Race in America by Psyche A. Williams-Forson, which was awarded the 2023 James Beard Foundation Book Award in Food Issues and Advocacy. Worry about YourselfWhen Food Shaming Black Folk Is a Thing In May 2019, an unsuspecting female African American employee of… Continue Reading Worry about Yourself: An Excerpt from “Eating While Black”

Must-Read Books During Black History Month

Happy Black History Month! Since 1976 the US has been celebrating Black History during the entire month of February. Long before that, however, UNC Press was already publishing distinguished scholarship on African American studies and we are proud to continue to do so. Most recently we announced the launch of our Black Women’s History Series which also hosts an incubator… Continue Reading Must-Read Books During Black History Month

Stromae’s Relational Aesthetic: An Excerpt From “Black Time and the Aesthetic Possibility of Objects”

The following is an excerpt from Black Time and the Aesthetic Possibility of Objects by Daphne Lamothe, which is available wherever books are sold. In May 2013, someone anonymously uploaded a sixty-second video titled “Stromae Bourré à Bruxelles!” (Stromae Drunk in Brussels!) to YouTube. The images, seemingly captured by a cellphone, show the musician Paul Van Haver in a state of… Continue Reading Stromae’s Relational Aesthetic: An Excerpt From “Black Time and the Aesthetic Possibility of Objects”

Lawless Law Enforcement: An Excerpt from “The Politics of Safety”

The Politics of Safety: The Black Struggle for Police Accountability in La Guardia’s New York by Shannon King is now available wherever books are sold. The following is an excerpt from Throughout the mid- to late 1920s, as a result of widespread corruption in the criminal justice system, the problem of “lawless law enforcement” loomed large across the nation, especially… Continue Reading Lawless Law Enforcement: An Excerpt from “The Politics of Safety”

Fighting to Desegregate the American Calendar (1968–1983): An Expert from “Living the Dream”

Today, in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, we’re featuring an excerpt from Living The Dream: The Contested History of Martin Luther King Jr. Day by Daniel T. Fleming. “In the first book-length study of its kind, Daniel Fleming has added significantly to our understanding of the King holiday and debates around it.” Renee Romano, author of Racial Reckoning: Prosecuting… Continue Reading Fighting to Desegregate the American Calendar (1968–1983): An Expert from “Living the Dream”

New This Week

It’s our first New Books Tuesday of 2024 and we’re excited to share two new books that are officially on-sale today. You can see everything new this month, including any new in paperbacks, on our Hot Off the Press page. Plus, sign up for our monthly eNews and you will get updates on new releases, sales, and other news on what’s happening at UNC Press… Continue Reading New This Week

Who Was Julia Chinn?: An Excerpt from “The Vice President’s Black Wife”

The following is an excerpt from the introduction of The Vice President’s Black Wife: The Untold Life of Julia Chinn by Amrita Chakrabarti Myers, which is available wherever books are sold. Who Was Julia Chinn? Julia Ann Chinn was an enslaved Black woman. Born sometime between 1790 and 1797, Julia was originally owned by Richard’s parents, Robert and Jemima Suggett… Continue Reading Who Was Julia Chinn?: An Excerpt from “The Vice President’s Black Wife”

Seeking Alternative Archives to Better Understand the Past

The following is a guest post by Whitney Nell Stewart, author of This is Our Home: Slavery and Struggle on Southern Plantations, which is now available wherever books are sold. This summer may have been one of the hottest on record, but in July 2012 I experienced a suffocating heat and humidity unlike anything this Gulf-South girl had ever felt.… Continue Reading Seeking Alternative Archives to Better Understand the Past

New Books This Week

We’ve arrived at another New Books Tuesday! Check out these two titles which are now available wherever books are sold. As always you can browse everything new this month on our Hot Off the Press page or sign up for our monthly e-news to get the list of new books delivered right to your inbox every month. Save 30% on… Continue Reading New Books This Week

New Books This Week

It’s Tuesday which means we have new books that are officially on-sale wherever books are sold! You can also see our list of everything new this month on our Hot Off the Press page and you can sign up for our monthly eNews to get updates in your inbox about new books, news, promotions and more. Boardinghouse Women: How Southern Keepers, Cooks, Nurses,… Continue Reading New Books This Week

Racial and Sexual Exclusion in World War II–Era Military and Veterans’ Policy: An excerpt from “Ambivalent Affinities”

The following is an excerpt of Ambivalent Affinities: A Political History of Blackness and Homosexuality after World War II by Jennifer Dominique Jones, which is available now wherever books are sold. In a January 31, 1942, letter to the Pittsburgh Courier, twenty-six-year-old James G. Thompson queried, “Should I sacrifice my life to live half [an]American? Would it be demanding too much to demand… Continue Reading Racial and Sexual Exclusion in World War II–Era Military and Veterans’ Policy: An excerpt from “Ambivalent Affinities”