Recovering a Forgotten Massacre of Black People in Reconstruction

The following is a guest blog post by William A. Blair, author of The Record of Murders and Outrages: Racial Violence and the Fight over Truth at the Dawn of Reconstruction. Blair uses the accounts of far-flung Freedmen’s Bureau agents to ask questions about the early days of Reconstruction, which are surprisingly resonant with the… Continue Reading Recovering a Forgotten Massacre of Black People in Reconstruction

2021 Association for the Study of African American Life and History Annual Meeting

Throughout the rest of September, the Association for the Study of African American Life and History is hosting their annual meeting virtually. We hope you’ll visit our ASALH 2021 virtual booth to browse our new and recent titles in African American history.  Acquisitions editors Brandon Proia and Andrew Winters would love to connect with you if you have a project that… Continue Reading 2021 Association for the Study of African American Life and History Annual Meeting

New and Recently Released UNC Press Audiobooks

We are pleased to announce the availability of the following UNC Press titles in audiobook format (sample audio excerpts are available via the links below): Closer to Freedom: Enslaved Women and Everyday Resistance in the Plantation South by Stephanie M. H. Camp, published by Tantor Media “Wonderfully evocative. . . . A provocative book full… Continue Reading New and Recently Released UNC Press Audiobooks

Workers’ Rights: A Reading List

Yesterday was Labor Day, “a federal holiday that recognize the American labor movement and the works and contributions of laborers to the development and achievements of the United States.” The very first Labor Day was celebrated in 1882, but, as many of you may know, we’re still fighting for a living wage for all, better working conditions and effective, well-protected workers’… Continue Reading Workers’ Rights: A Reading List

“Fake News” and Racial Violence after the Civil War

The following is a guest blog post by William A. Blair, author of The Record of Murders and Outrages: Racial Violence and the Fight over Truth at the Dawn of Reconstruction. Blair uses the accounts of far-flung Freedmen’s Bureau agents to ask questions about the early days of Reconstruction, which are surprisingly resonant with the present… Continue Reading “Fake News” and Racial Violence after the Civil War

New Orleans, A Resilient People: A Reading List

To help the victims of Hurricane Ida, visit these links to learn more about the local organizations who need your financial support in serving those affected: How to Help Hurricane Ida Victims Right Now Want to donate or volunteer to assist those affected by Hurricane Ida? Here’s how to help If you’ve been keeping up… Continue Reading New Orleans, A Resilient People: A Reading List

Left of Black web series featuring LaKisha Simmons, author of Crescent City Girls: The Lives of Young Black Women in Segregated New Orleans

LaKisha Simmons, author of Crescent City Girls: The Lives of Young Black Women in Segregated New Orleans, was featured on John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute’s Left of Black web series. Left of Black is a web series featuring interviews with Black Studies scholars created and hosted by James B. Duke Distinguished Professor of African and African… Continue Reading Left of Black web series featuring LaKisha Simmons, author of Crescent City Girls: The Lives of Young Black Women in Segregated New Orleans

Tainted Tap: Preface

To spread awareness of National Water Quality Month, I decided to post an excerpt from one of the titles featured last week on our “Happy National Water Quality Month!” recommended reading list. This excerpt is from the Preface of Katrinell M. Davis’ Tainted Tap: Flint’s Journey from Crisis to Recovery. Assessing the challenges that community… Continue Reading Tainted Tap: Preface

Happy National Water Quality Month! A Recommended Reading List

Did you know “Every year, more people die from unsafe water than from all forms of violence, including war”? With statistics like that, spreading the knowledge behind National Water Quality Month is a necessity. Most communities affected by unsafe water were never cared for from the beginning, so it’s important that those who have the means fight… Continue Reading Happy National Water Quality Month! A Recommended Reading List

The Center for the Study of Southern Culture SouthTalks series featuring B. Brian Foster, author of I Don’t Like the Blues: Race, Place, and the Backbeat of Black Life, and filmmaker Zaire Love

In April, The Center for the Study of Southern Culture hosted a talk between B. Brian Foster, author of I Don’t Like The Blues: Race, Black and Backbeat of Black Life, and award-winning filmmaker Zaire Love. Watch as they discuss the collaborative visual they created for Foster’s book, the many sides of black identity in Mississippi, the… Continue Reading The Center for the Study of Southern Culture SouthTalks series featuring B. Brian Foster, author of I Don’t Like the Blues: Race, Place, and the Backbeat of Black Life, and filmmaker Zaire Love

The Library Company of Philadelphia’s Fireside Chat with Crystal Lynn Webster, author of Beyond the Boundaries of Childhood: African American Children in the Antebellum North

Last week, The Library Company of Philadelphia hosted a Fireside Chat with Crystal Lynn Webster, author of Beyond the Boundaries of Childhood: African American Children in the Antebellum North. Drawing evidence from the urban centers of Boston, New York, and Philadelphia, Crystal Webster’s innovative research yields a powerful new history of African American childhood before… Continue Reading The Library Company of Philadelphia’s Fireside Chat with Crystal Lynn Webster, author of Beyond the Boundaries of Childhood: African American Children in the Antebellum North

The Shot Heard Round The World

The following is a guest blog post by Robert G. Parkinson, author of Thirteen Clocks: How Race United the Colonies and Made the Declaration of Independence, published by the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture and the University of North Carolina Press. In Thirteen Clocks, Parkinson argues that patriot leaders used racial prejudices to persuade… Continue Reading The Shot Heard Round The World

“Half in Shadow: Black Women in Academia”, Charlotte Mecklenburg Library’s Conversation with UNC Press Author Dr. Shanna Greene Benjamin and Dr. Janaka Bowman Lewis

Hosted by Charlotte Mecklenburg Library, Dr. Shanna Greene Benjamin, author of Half In Shadow: The Life and Legacy of Nellie Y. McKay, and Dr. Janaka Bowman Lewis, discuss topics related to Benjamin’s book Half In Shadow. Watch below as Dr. Benjamin and Dr. Lewis examine academia’s relationship with black women, who Nellie Y. McKay is… Continue Reading “Half in Shadow: Black Women in Academia”, Charlotte Mecklenburg Library’s Conversation with UNC Press Author Dr. Shanna Greene Benjamin and Dr. Janaka Bowman Lewis

The Last News Story of Colonial America

Guest blog post by Robert G. Parkinson, author of Thirteen Clocks: How Race United the Colonies and Made the Declaration of Independence What was the tipping point that pushed Americans into taking the step of declaring their independence? After all, the colonies had been at war with Britain for more than a year by the end… Continue Reading The Last News Story of Colonial America

“Colored Conventions Show Us Where Democracy Really Happens”, Democracy Works Podcast featuring P. Gabrielle Foreman and Jim Casey

In April, P. Gabrielle Foreman and Jim Casey, contributors to The Colored Conventions Movement: Black Organizing in the Nineteenth Century, were featured on Penn State’s Democracy Works podcast. If you’re not already familiar with these two, they’ve been doing some incredible work to detail the history of The Colored Conventions movement, the nineteenth century’s longest campaign for… Continue Reading “Colored Conventions Show Us Where Democracy Really Happens”, Democracy Works Podcast featuring P. Gabrielle Foreman and Jim Casey

Mount Vernon’s Virtual Book Talk with Author Tamika Nunley

Tamika Nunley, author of At the Threshold of Liberty: Women, Slavery, and Shifting Identities in Washington, D.C., was featured on Mount Vernon’s virtual book talk series earlier this year. During the talk, Tamika discusses her book, the portrait of Elizabeth Keckley used as the books cover, the tradition of education amongst enslaved people and even… Continue Reading Mount Vernon’s Virtual Book Talk with Author Tamika Nunley

Harriet, the Moses of Her People: Preface

In celebration of Disability Pride Month, I decided to post an excerpt from one of the titles from our recommended reading list published last week. This excerpt is the preface from Sarah Hopkins Bradford’s Harriet, the Moses of Her People. The title I have given my black heroine, in this second edition of her story,… Continue Reading Harriet, the Moses of Her People: Preface

Happy Disability Pride Month! A Recommended Reading List

If you didn’t know already, July is Disability Pride month. The celebration of Disability Pride began in 1990 and has held on strong ever since. “This annual observance is used to promote visibility and mainstream awareness of the positive pride felt by people with disabilities.” Below are a few titles that align with that point… Continue Reading Happy Disability Pride Month! A Recommended Reading List

Time to Reset Your Syllabi, Vast Early America

Guest blog post by Catherine E. Kelly of the Omohundro Institute I came to the project that would become Thirteen Clocks: How Race United the Colonies and Made the Declaration of Independence the hard way – through the college classroom. Before joining the Omohundro Institute, I taught American history first at Case Western Reserve University and then… Continue Reading Time to Reset Your Syllabi, Vast Early America

Capitalism and Slavery: The Development Of The Negro Slave Trade

For our last bit of JuneTeenth celebration this month, I decided to pull an excerpt from one of the books featured in our two part commemorative JuneTeenth recommended reading list (Part One, Part Two). This excerpt is from Eric Williams and Colin A. Palmer’s Capitalism and Slavery, Third Edition.  The negro slaves were “the strength and… Continue Reading Capitalism and Slavery: The Development Of The Negro Slave Trade