Excerpt: Jamie DeMent–A Turkey Story for Thanksgiving

Today, just in time for Thanksgiving, we bring you a turkey story from Jamie DeMent’s book, The Farmhouse Chef: Recipes and Stories from My Carolina Farm, now available at bookstores and from UNC Press. ### Talking Turkey Ooooggle woogle woogle ooogggle woogle woogle blub blub blub. This is the sound turkeys really make–none of that gobble… Continue Reading Excerpt: Jamie DeMent–A Turkey Story for Thanksgiving

Alice Elizabeth Malavasic: What’s in a Name?

Today we welcome a guest blog post from Alice Elizabeth Malavasic, author of The F Street Mess:  How Southern Senators Rewrote the Kansas-Nebraska Act. Pushing back against the idea that the Slave Power conspiracy was merely an ideological construction, The F Street Mess argues that some southern politicians in the 1850s did indeed hold an… Continue Reading Alice Elizabeth Malavasic: What’s in a Name?

Happy Thanksgiving: A roundup of holiday recipes from UNC Press cookbooks

Happy Thanksgiving! As we enter this week of food, family and fun, here’s a run-down of our favorite Thanksgiving holiday recipe posts from UNC Press cookbook authors. We hope you’ll find a recipe or two that you can add to your holiday table. Remember, you can order all of these books and save 40 percent… Continue Reading Happy Thanksgiving: A roundup of holiday recipes from UNC Press cookbooks

M.J. Rymsza-Pawlowska : New Museums and New (Kinds of) Histories

Today, we welcome a guest post from M.J. Rymsza-Pawlowska, author of History Comes Alive:  Public History and Popular Culture in the 1970s, on our changing ideas about museums. During the 1976 Bicentennial celebration, millions of Americans engaged with the past in brand-new ways. They became absorbed by historical miniseries like Roots, visited museums with new… Continue Reading M.J. Rymsza-Pawlowska : New Museums and New (Kinds of) Histories

Irfan Ahmad: Beyond Trump’s Notion of the “Pathetic Critic”

Today we welcome a guest post from Irfan Ahmad, author of Religion as Critique:  Islamic Critical Thinking from Mecca to the Marketplace.  Professor Ahmad is an anthropologist and senior research fellow at the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Studies in Göttingen, Germany. In Religion as Critique, Irfan Ahmad makes the far-reaching… Continue Reading Irfan Ahmad: Beyond Trump’s Notion of the “Pathetic Critic”

Megan Raby: Ecology and U.S. Empire in the Caribbean

Today we welcome a guest blog post from Megan Raby, author of American Tropics:  The Caribbean Roots of Biodiversity Science. Biodiversity has been a key concept in international conservation since the 1980s, yet historians have paid little attention to its origins. Uncovering its roots in tropical fieldwork and the southward expansion of U.S. empire at… Continue Reading Megan Raby: Ecology and U.S. Empire in the Caribbean

Mary Elizabeth Basile Chopas: The Lessons of World War II Selective Internment

Today, we welcome a guest post from Mary Elizabeth Basile Chopas, author of Searching for Subversives:  The Story of Italian Internment in Wartime America. When the United States entered World War II, Italian nationals living in this country were declared enemy aliens and faced with legal restrictions. Several thousand aliens and a few U.S. citizens… Continue Reading Mary Elizabeth Basile Chopas: The Lessons of World War II Selective Internment

University Press Week 2017: Blog Tour Day 5

University Press Week wraps up today with the blog tour day 5’s theme of Libraries and Librarians helping us all #LookItUP. Today’s posts: Friday, November 10, 2017: Libraries and Librarians helping us all #LookItUP University of Georgia Press University of Missouri Press University of Nebraska Press University Press of Florida   Be sure to read… Continue Reading University Press Week 2017: Blog Tour Day 5

University Press Week 2017: Blog Tour Day 4

University Press Week continues with the blog tour day 4’s theme of #TwitterStorm. Today’s posts: Thursday, November 9, 2017: #TwitterStorm Athabasca University Press Beacon Press Harvard University Press Johns Hopkins University Press   Be sure to read up on this week’s earlier themes: Day 1:  Scholarship Making a Difference Day 2:  Selling the Facts Day 3: … Continue Reading University Press Week 2017: Blog Tour Day 4

UNC Press’s Office of Scholarly Publishing Services Partners with the UNC School of Government Publications

On October 1, 2017, the University of North Carolina Press’s Office of Scholarly Publishing Services (OSPS) launched a partnership with the UNC–Chapel Hill School of Government to provide distribution and other publishing services for its publications. The School of Government is publisher of more than 125 books, bulletins, and reports for North Carolina public officials… Continue Reading UNC Press’s Office of Scholarly Publishing Services Partners with the UNC School of Government Publications

University Press Week 2017: Blog Tour Day 3

University Press Week continues with the blog tour day 3’s theme of Producing the Books that Matter. Today’s posts: Wednesday, November 8, 2017: Producing the Books that Matter Fordham University Press Georgetown University Press University of British Columbia Press University of California Press University of Kansas Press University of Michigan Press University of Washington Press Yale… Continue Reading University Press Week 2017: Blog Tour Day 3

Elaine Maisner: Announcing a Multimedia Collaboration between UNC Press and Mavcor on Material Religion

Elaine Maisner is Executive Editor at UNC Press.  A Communion of Shadows: Religion and Photography in Nineteenth-Century America, is available now in both print and e-book editions. ### As the UNC Press editor responsible for our list in religious studies, I am delighted to announce that Rachel McBride Lindsey’s book, A Communion of Shadows: Religion… Continue Reading Elaine Maisner: Announcing a Multimedia Collaboration between UNC Press and Mavcor on Material Religion

University Press Week 2017: Blog Tour Day 2

University Press Week continues with the blog tour day 2’s theme of Selling the Facts. Today’s posts: Tuesday, November 7, 2017:  Selling the Facts Duke University Press Columbia University Press Johns Hopkins University Press University of Hawaii Press University Press of Kentucky University of Minnesota Press University of Texas Press University of Toronto Press Be… Continue Reading University Press Week 2017: Blog Tour Day 2

Joan Marie Johnson: November 6, 1917 — Women Win the Right to Vote in New York State

Today we welcome a guest post from Joan Marie Johnson, author of Funding Feminism: Monied Women, Philanthropy, and the Women’s Movement, 1870–1967, on how women won the right to vote in New York State. In Funding Feminism, Joan Marie Johnson examines an understudied dimension of women’s history in the United States: how a group of… Continue Reading Joan Marie Johnson: November 6, 1917 — Women Win the Right to Vote in New York State

University Press Week 2017: Blog Tour Day 1

Scholarly Publishers Select Theme Resonating in Time of Fake News — #LookItUP: Knowledge Matters is Theme of University Press Week, November 6-11 In a time when the public’s trust in facts and knowledge is waning, the Association of American University Presses (AAUP) has chosen “#LookItUP: Knowledge Matters” as the theme for this year’s University Press… Continue Reading University Press Week 2017: Blog Tour Day 1

Happening this week: An online roundtable on Antiracism in Cuba: The Unfinished Revolution by Devyn Spence Benson

Black Perspectives, the blog of the African American Intellectual History Society (AAIHS), is hosting an online roundtable on Devyn Spence Benson’s Antiracism in Cuba: The Unfinished Revolution, published in 2016 by UNC Press. The roundtable begins on Monday, November 6, 2017, and concludes on Saturday, November 11, 2017. The roundtable will feature responses from Yesenia Barragan (Dartmouth College)… Continue Reading Happening this week: An online roundtable on Antiracism in Cuba: The Unfinished Revolution by Devyn Spence Benson

Eve E. Buckley: The Power and Paucity of Primary Documents for Latin American Historians

Today we welcome a guest blog post from Eve E. Buckley, author of Technocrats and the Politics of Drought and Development in Twentieth-Century Brazil, on drought and regional development in Brazil. Eve E. Buckley’s study of twentieth-century Brazil examines the nation’s hard social realities through the history of science, focusing on the use of technology and… Continue Reading Eve E. Buckley: The Power and Paucity of Primary Documents for Latin American Historians

M.J. Rymsza-Pawlowska: Consuming History

Today, we welcome a guest post from M.J. Rymsza-Pawlowska, author of History Comes Alive:  Public History and Popular Culture in the 1970s, on throwback jerseys and limited edition cereal boxes. During the 1976 Bicentennial celebration, millions of Americans engaged with the past in brand-new ways. They became absorbed by historical miniseries like Roots, visited museums… Continue Reading M.J. Rymsza-Pawlowska: Consuming History

Jessica Ziparo: One Hundred and Fifty Years of Equal Pay

Today we welcome a guest post from Jessica Ziparo, author of This Grand Experiment:  When Women Entered the Federal Workforce in Civil War–Era Washington, D.C., looking back on the first debates about equal pay for equal work. In the volatility of the Civil War, the federal government opened its payrolls to women. Thousands of female… Continue Reading Jessica Ziparo: One Hundred and Fifty Years of Equal Pay

Muriel R. Gillick, M.D.: Happy Birthday, Medicare

Today, we welcome a guest post from Dr. Muriel R. Gillick, author of Old and Sick in America:  The Journey through the Health Care System, on the founding of the national health insurance program we call Medicare. Since the introduction of Medicare and Medicaid in 1965, the American health care system has steadily grown in… Continue Reading Muriel R. Gillick, M.D.: Happy Birthday, Medicare