Recipe: Crab & Shrimp Calas

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Cover image for Crabs and OystersEvery Tuesday this summer we’re featuring a new recipe on the blog from one of our Savor the South® cookbooks. Each little cookbook in our Savor the South® cookbook collection is a big celebration of a beloved food or tradition of the American South. From buttermilk to bourbon, pecans to peaches, bacon to catfish, one by one each volume will stock a kitchen shelf with the flavors and culinary wisdom of this popular American regional cuisine. Written by well-known cooks and food lovers, each book brims with personality, the informative and often surprising culinary and natural history of southern foodways, and a treasure of some fifty recipes—from delicious southern classics to sparkling international renditions that open up worlds of taste for cooks everywhere. You’ll want to collect them all.

Today’s recipe is from Bill Smith’s Crabs and Oysters. Bill Smith is the chef at Crook’s Corner Restaurant in Chapel Hill, N.C., and author of Seasoned in the South: Recipes and Stories from Crook’s Corner and Home, a New York Times notable cookbook and Food & Wine Best-of-the-Best cookbook. You can follow him on Twitter @Chulegre. Whether you made it to the beach this summer or not, you can still enjoy this tasty seafood dish!

Don’t forget to “like” the Savor the South® book page on Facebook for more news and recipes. Also, check back here next Tuesday for another Savor the South® Sampler recipe!

Continue reading ‘Recipe: Crab & Shrimp Calas’ »

Excerpt: Not Straight, Not White, by Kevin J. Mumford

Cover image of Not Straight, Not WhiteThis compelling book recounts the history of black gay men from the 1950s to the 1990s, tracing how the major movements of the times—from civil rights to black power to gay liberation to AIDS activism—helped shape the cultural stigmas that surrounded race and homosexuality. In locating the rise of black gay identities in historical context, Kevin Mumford explores how activists, performers, and writers rebutted negative stereotypes and refused sexual objectification. Examining the lives of both famous and little-known black gay activists—from James Baldwin and Bayard Rustin to Joseph Beam and Brother Grant-Michael Fitzgerald—Mumford analyzes the ways in which movements for social change both inspired and marginalized black gay men.

In the following excerpt from Not Straight, Not White: Black Gay Men from the March on Washington to the AIDS Crisis (pp. 11-13), Mumford describes a meeting between Bobby Kennedy and Lorraine Hansberry, James Baldwin, and Jerome Smith that he considers the beginning of modern black gay activism.

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Lorraine Hansberry, James Baldwin, and Bayard Rustin—each belongs to African American gay history while contributing to a turning point in the civil rights movement in the summer of 1963. Their queer intervention concerned, first, the federal government’s role in protecting southern demonstrators, during an important meeting between Baldwin, Hansberry, and an assortment of other celebrities with Attorney General Robert Kennedy in his Manhattan home, and, second, Rustin’s disputed role in the iconic mass demonstration the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. By this time Baldwin had published The Fire Next Time, the best-selling “disturbing examination of the consequences of racial injustice,” and Hansberry had distinguished herself as the youngest and first black woman to win the New York Drama Desk award for the Broadway sensation A Raisin in the Sun. The two writers were introduced during the workshop production of Baldwin’s Giovanni’s Room, based on his controversial 1956 gay novel, and met again at the premiere of Hansberry’s play in Philadelphia. Though a box-office success, a few had criticized the drama for its apparent celebration of the American dream of upward mobility, but in a brief 1961 review Baldwin instead compared Hansberry to the radical novelist and essayist Richard Wright, emphasizing their shared critical vision of an American dystopia.[1]

Their meeting with Kennedy on May 24, 1963 was prompted in part by Baldwin’s essay “Letter from a Region in My Mind,” which appeared during the increasingly violent spring of police-demonstrator confrontations in Birmingham and other southern cities.[2] Published in the New Yorker, the long piece meditated on American racism, seeing white prejudice as arising from the reality that the “white man’s masculinity depends on a denial of the masculinity of the blacks” and that therefore the nation subjected the “Negro” to many “horrors.” After reading the essay, Kennedy had reportedly contacted Baldwin and sought the meeting because he wished to hear “fresh” ideas on “coping with civil rights problems.” If he had invited only the older and more moderate celebrities, such as Lena Horne or Harry Belafonte, it seems unlikely that the meeting would have ended as it did, in frank disagreement and an acrimonious exit. But the presence of Jerome Smith, a participant in the southern Freedom Rides that continued to press for the desegregation of buses and stations, had raised the stakes. Baldwin referred to Smith as a “tremendous man,” recalling his police beating with brass knuckles in demonstrations in New Orleans. Smith’s presence attested to the need for stronger federal protection of demonstrators. Along with Smith, Baldwin and Hansberry became the most notable participants in the secret meeting, with photographs of the two published the day after, dubbed by the New York Times as the “ ‘angry young Negroes,’ ” which presented the public with a compelling combination of rebellion, celebrity, and creative genius.[3]

Continue reading ‘Excerpt: Not Straight, Not White, by Kevin J. Mumford’ »

  1. [1] Black and White Men Together Newsletter (BWMT ) New York 2, no. 7 (1982): 1, BWMT Ephemera Collection, John J. Wilcox Library, William Way Community Center, Philadelphia, Pa. (WW); James S. Tinney, “James Baldwin ‘Comes Out’ at Gay Forum,” Blacklight 3, no. 5 (1982): 1.
  2. [2] “BWMT Celebrates Fifth Anniversary, March 7–13, 1986,” Philadelphia Gay News; “Ad Hoc Planning Report,” January 19, 1986, BWMT Ephemera Collection, WW; “BWMT—PHILA, 5th,” BWMT Ephemera Collection, WW.
  3. [3] D’Emilio, Sexual Politics; Bérubé, Coming Out under Fire; Chauncey, Gay New York; Stein, City of Sisterly and Brotherly Loves; Houlbrook, Queer London; N. Boyd, Wide-Open Town; White, Pre-Gay L.A.; Avicolli, Smash the Church; Faderman and Timmons, Gay L.A.; Howard, Men Like That; Hoag, Same-Sex Affairs; Marcus, Making Gay History; Beemyn, Creating a Place for Ourselves; Stryker and Van Buskirk, Gay by the Bay.

Recipe: Pecan Pimento Cheese

Savor the South header

Cover image for PecansEvery Tuesday this summer we’re featuring a new recipe on the blog from one of our Savor the South® cookbooks. Each little cookbook in our Savor the South® cookbook collection is a big celebration of a beloved food or tradition of the American South. From buttermilk to bourbon, pecans to peaches, bacon to catfish, one by one each volume will stock a kitchen shelf with the flavors and culinary wisdom of this popular American regional cuisine. Written by well-known cooks and food lovers, each book brims with personality, the informative and often surprising culinary and natural history of southern foodways, and a treasure of some fifty recipes—from delicious southern classics to sparkling international renditions that open up worlds of taste for cooks everywhere. You’ll want to collect them all.

Today’s recipe is from Kathleen Purvis’s Pecans. Purvis is the food editor of the Charlotte Observer, a well known food writer, and a long-time member of the Southern Foodways Alliance. She is also the author of Bourbon. Follow her on Twitter @kathleenpurvis. Her recipe for pecan pimento cheese makes for an easy and delicious snack.

Don’t forget to “like” the Savor the South® book page on Facebook for more news and recipes. Also, check back here next Tuesday for another Savor the South® Sampler recipe!

Continue reading ‘Recipe: Pecan Pimento Cheese’ »

Excerpt: The Voyage of the Slave Ship Hare, by Sean M. Kelley

Cover of The Voyage of the Slave Ship HareFrom 1754 to 1755, the slave ship Hare completed a journey from Newport, Rhode Island, to Sierra Leone and back to the United States—a journey that transformed more than seventy Africans into commodities, condemning some to death and the rest to a life of bondage in North America. In this engaging narrative, Sean Kelley painstakingly reconstructs this tumultuous voyage, detailing everything from the identities of the captain and crew to their wild encounters with inclement weather, slave traders, and near-mutiny. But most importantly, Kelley tracks the cohort of slaves aboard the Hare from their purchase in Africa to their sale in South Carolina. In tracing their complete journey, Kelley provides rare insight into the communal lives of slaves and sheds new light on the African diaspora and its influence on the formation of African American culture.

In the following excerpt from The Voyage of the Slave Ship Hare: A Journey into Captivity from Sierra Leone to South Carolina (pp. 159-162), Kelley describes how slaves formed communities in America.

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Whether on rice and indigo plantations, in Charles Town, or on the isolated savannahs of the backcountry, slavery imposed severe limitations on the Hare captives’ lives in the New World. Yet enslavement did not determine all aspects of existence, and the contours of everyday life were largely in the hands of the Africans and Creoles of the Low Country’s many communities. These communities, or neighborhoods, varied widely as a result of many factors: the particular crop regime or economic activity; the temperament and plantation practices of local whites; the geographic location; the density of the population; the proximity of other polities, such as the Spanish or native groups; and the state of development of the locality. But from the perspective of the Hare captives, no issue loomed larger than the presence of those who spoke the same language and who shared an understanding of the world. The proximity of “countrymen,” in the terminology of the era, was a potential source of comfort at a time of extreme fear and uncertainty. In the first months of New World captivity, a more experienced countryman or countrywoman could explain plantation routines and perhaps even save a new arrival from punishment. A countryman could help with the all-important process of language acquisition. Lastly, someone of a similar background could help introduce the newcomer to the plantation community and to the wider neighborhood. For the newly arrived Hare captives, a great deal depended on the presence of people of similar backgrounds.

It is hard to know exactly how many of the Hare captives lived in clusters that permitted them contact with their countrymen and countrywomen. To start, we do know that forty-four of the fifty-six were purchased along with at least one other Hare captive, while eleven were purchased singly, but even being purchased together did not necessarily mean the captives would stay together. Africans throughout the Americas placed a special importance on the shipmate relationship. Shipmates treated one another as kin, and recognition of the bond might continue into subsequent generations. However, being purchased in company with another Hare captive did not guarantee an enduring, close shipmate relationship. As we have already seen, several purchasers owned multiple properties, and the possibility of separation onto different estates was certainly present, whether immediately or in later years. Horry and Lessesne, for example, bought seven captives between them but never operated a plantation together, which means they probably divided the captives between themselves or resold them immediately.

Continue reading ‘Excerpt: The Voyage of the Slave Ship Hare, by Sean M. Kelley’ »

Recipe: Ginger-Peach Soda

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Southern Holidays: a Savor the South® cookbook, by Debbie MooseEvery Tuesday this summer we’re featuring a new recipe on the blog from one of our Savor the South® cookbooks. Each little cookbook in our Savor the South® cookbook collection is a big celebration of a beloved food or tradition of the American South. From buttermilk to bourbon, pecans to peaches, bacon to catfish, one by one each volume will stock a kitchen shelf with the flavors and culinary wisdom of this popular American regional cuisine. Written by well-known cooks and food lovers, each book brims with personality, the informative and often surprising culinary and natural history of southern foodways, and a treasure of some fifty recipes—from delicious southern classics to sparkling international renditions that open up worlds of taste for cooks everywhere. You’ll want to collect them all.

Today’s recipe is from Debbie Moose’s Southern Holidays. Moose is an award-winning food writer and author of many cookbooks, including Buttermilk: A Savor the South® Cookbook. Follow her on Twitter @DebbieMoose. The following recipe for Ginger-Peach Soda uses fresh ginger and peaches—a refreshing companion for those warm summer evenings on the porch.

Don’t forget to “like” the Savor the South® book page on Facebook for more news and recipes. Also, check back here next Tuesday for another Savor the South® Sampler recipe!

Continue reading ‘Recipe: Ginger-Peach Soda’ »

Video: Learn Southern Cooking with Jennifer Brulé

Learn to Cook 25 Southern Classics 3 Ways, by Jennifer Brule, cover imageChef and food writer Jennifer Brulé talks about her forthcoming book, Learn to Cook 25 Southern Classics 3 Ways: Traditional, Contemporary, International, and demonstrates a simple recipe for tomato pie.

For Brulé, like for many southerners, food and stories go hand in hand. Enjoy a little of both!

Learn to Cook 25 Southern Classics 3 Ways will be published next month, but you can pre-order your copy now.

Recipe: Oven-Fried Okra

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Okra: a Savor the South® cookbook, by Virginia WillisEvery Tuesday this summer we’re featuring a new recipe on the blog from one of our Savor the South® cookbooks. Each little cookbook in our Savor the South® cookbook collection is a big celebration of a beloved food or tradition of the American South. From buttermilk to bourbon, pecans to peaches, bacon to catfish, one by one each volume will stock a kitchen shelf with the flavors and culinary wisdom of this popular American regional cuisine. Written by well-known cooks and food lovers, each book brims with personality, the informative and often surprising culinary and natural history of southern foodways, and a treasure of some fifty recipes—from delicious southern classics to sparkling international renditions that open up worlds of taste for cooks everywhere. You’ll want to collect them all.

Today’s recipe is from Virginia Willis’s Okra. Chef and food writer Virginia Willis hails from Atlanta and is the author of Bon Appétit, Y’all, Basic to Brilliant, Y’all, and the James Beard Award-winning Lighten Up, Y’all. Willis sure knows her okra, too. Fried okra is a Southern favorite, and Willis prepares hers in the oven instead of a deep fryer. Oven-fried okra pairs perfectly with barbecue, or on its own as a delectable snack!

Don’t forget to “like” the Savor the South® book page on Facebook for more news and recipes. Also, check back here next Tuesday for another Savor the South® Sampler recipe!

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J. Michael Butler: Wendel Blackwell, Philando Castile, and the Continuing Black American Freedom Struggle

Beyond Integration: The Black Freedom Struggle in Escambia County, Florida, 1960-1980, by J. Michael ButlerWe welcome to the blog a guest post from J. Michael Butler, author of Beyond Integration: The Black Freedom Struggle in Escambia County, Florida, 1960-1980In 1975, Florida’s Escambia County and the city of Pensacola experienced a pernicious chain of events. A sheriff’s deputy killed a young black man at point-blank range. Months of protests against police brutality followed, culminating in the arrest and conviction of the Reverend H. K. Matthews, the leading civil rights organizer in the county.

Viewing the events of Escambia County within the context of the broader civil rights movement, J. Michael Butler demonstrates that while activism of the previous decade destroyed most visible and dramatic signs of racial segregation, institutionalized forms of cultural racism still persisted.

In today’s post, Butler relates how one Florida community’s experience indicates that recent murders of black people by law enforcement officers embody a much larger–and longer–national fight for racial justice.

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Why Pensacola? The question inevitably surfaces every time I discuss my latest publication with those who express interest. The answer can be long and meandering, as historians often are, but the most important reason is because Pensacola’s story is not its own. The story of racial power, privilege, change, and continuity in the years beyond integration is one that is familiar across America. Look no further that the recent murders of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile.

The Sterling and Castile shootings have revived the national debate over the role race occupies when white police officers use deadly force against African American men. Yet often lost in the response to the subsequent anger and protests is the historical context that surrounds the justifiable black mistrust of law enforcement policies and practices. From Groveland, Florida, to Philadelphia, Mississippi, to Detroit, Michigan–and numerous places in between both geographically and chronologically–white law enforcement officers at the local and state levels have murdered black men with impunity and often escaped punishment for their actions.

The perception that police departments were the most formidable bastions of white supremacy became an entrenched reality for African Americans during the 1960s civil rights movement and continued thereafter. My research into the Pensacola, Florida, black freedom struggle demonstrates that the Sterling and Castile deaths embody a much larger–and longer–national fight for racial justice than many realize.

The mistrust of local police has a long history in Escambia County, but it became linked to the area freedom struggle during the 1961 Pensacola sit-ins when officers placed items in the pockets of young demonstrators and arrested them for shoplifting. Ten years later, the county sheriff’s department settled a discrimination lawsuit with an African American male that revealed, among other things, the agency refused black prisoners access to medicine, food, showers, clothing, and attorney visits, and maintained six open-roof confinement cells that segregated prisoners by race.

In 1969 the Pensacola NAACP’s Youth Council listed “police brutality” as one of their two primary concerns for the coming decade, and numerous incidents supported their claim into the 1970s. When five black men from Atlanta disappeared during a 1974 fishing expedition under mysterious circumstances, suspicions that the Escambia County Sheriff’s Department hid their racially motivated murders attracted national attention. The national SCLC discovered only circumstantial evidence that a crime occurred, but cited the acrimonious history between local blacks and the department as proof of its complicity in “one of the biggest mass murders this state has ever seen.” The explosive allegation heightened the acrimony that existed between African Americans and law enforcement in Northwest Florida for decades and established the volatile foundations for communal unrest when a white deputy killed a black motorist the following month.

On December 20, 1974, Deputy Doug Raines shot Wendel Blackwell in the head from a three-foot distance when he exited his vehicle after a high-speed chase through Pensacola. Witness statements from present deputies and their white passengers did not all support that Blackwell was killed in self-defense, but the county sheriff took no disciplinary action against Raines and remained unwavering in his support of the deputy. Continue reading ‘J. Michael Butler: Wendel Blackwell, Philando Castile, and the Continuing Black American Freedom Struggle’ »

Excerpt: Sea Breeze activity from Lessons from the Sand

cover image of Lessons from the SandEver wonder where sand comes from? Or why shells are colored differently? Or how to estimate the size of a wave? Featuring more than forty fun hands-on activities for families with children, Lessons from the Sand: Family-Friendly Science Activities You Can Do on a Carolina Beach, reveals the science behind the amazing natural wonders found on the beaches of North Carolina and South Carolina. Easy-to-do experiments will help parents and kids discover the ways water, wind, sand, plants, animals, and people interact to shape the constantly changing beaches we love to visit.

See our previous post in which a twelve-year-old budding naturalist reports on his experiments using the book on the Outer Banks. In the following excerpt (pp. 38-42), authors Charles O. Pilkey and Orrin H. Pilkey explain how the sea breeze shapes the beach. Families can observe this phenomenon for themselves through this fun sea breeze activity.

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Activity 7

Sea Breeze

You don’t need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows.
                                   —Bob Dylan (American singer and songwriter)

Mother and daughter stood together on an empty beach, watching the waves come thundering in.
“How are beaches formed?” asked the daughter.
“Waves make beaches,” answered the mother, “by pushing sand around.”
“So what makes the waves?”
“The wind, of course.”
“Why does the wind blow?”
“Heat from the sun,” said the mother, “causes the air to move around.”
“How come the sun is hot?”
“Hydrogen atoms fuse together, giving off light and heat. It’s kind of like a nuclear bomb,” explained the mother.
“Why do the atoms fuse together?”
“Gravity.”
“Oh, so the sun’s gravity makes beaches. What makes gravity?”
“You ask a lot of questions,” said the mother. “Let’s go for a swim.”

Everything in nature is connected by an intricate chain of cause and effect, though we don’t always see all the links in the chain. It’s easy to stand on a beach, for example, and watch waves moving sand around, but we tend to forget it’s the wind that makes the waves. In that sense, wind is the fundamental cause of major changes on a beach.

illustration of girl feeling the sea breeze

Illustration © Charles O. Pilkey.

Sea Breeze

When the breeze blows from sea to land, it’s called an onshore wind or, simply, a sea breeze. When the wind blows from land to sea, it’s known as an offshore wind or land breeze. During conditions of fair weather, sea and land breezes are nearly always present at the beach. What’s interesting is how these breezes predictably change every day.

Continue reading ‘Excerpt: Sea Breeze activity from Lessons from the Sand’ »

Recipe: Bourbon Benedict

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Bourbon cover photo

Every Tuesday this summer we’re featuring a new recipe on the blog from one of our Savor the South® cookbooks. Each little cookbook in our Savor the South® cookbook collection is a big celebration of a beloved food or tradition of the American South. From buttermilk to bourbon, pecans to peaches, bacon to catfish, one by one each volume will stock a kitchen shelf with the flavors and culinary wisdom of this popular American regional cuisine. Written by well-known cooks and food lovers, each book brims with personality, the informative and often surprising culinary and natural history of southern foodways, and a treasure of some fifty recipes—from delicious southern classics to sparkling international renditions that open up worlds of taste for cooks everywhere. You’ll want to collect them all.

Today’s recipe is from Kathleen Purvis’s Bourbon Purvis is the food editor of the Charlotte Observer, a well-known food writer, and a long-time member of the Southern Foodways Alliance. After Pecans, this is her second book. Her recipe is great for those mornings when you feel like making something a little more special than your run-of-the-mill bacon and eggs.

Don’t forget to “like” the Savor the South® book page on Facebook for more news and recipes. Also, check back here next Tuesday for another Savor the South® Sampler recipe!

Continue reading ‘Recipe: Bourbon Benedict’ »

Emily Suzanne Clark: 150 Years After the Mechanics’ Institute Riot

A Luminous Brotherhood, by Emily Suzanne Clark, cover imageIn the midst of a nineteenth-century boom in spiritual experimentation, the Cercle Harmonique, a remarkable group of African-descended men, practiced Spiritualism in heavily Catholic New Orleans from just before the Civil War to the end of Reconstruction. In A Luminous Brotherhood: Afro-Creole Spiritualism in Nineteenth-Century New Orleans, the first comprehensive history of the Cercle, Emily Suzanne Clark illuminates how highly diverse religious practices wind in significant ways through American life, culture, and history. Clark shows that the beliefs and practices of Spiritualism helped Afro-Creoles mediate the political and social changes in New Orleans, as free blacks suffered increasingly restrictive laws and then met with violent resistance to suffrage and racial equality.

In today’s guest post, Clark discusses white-on-black violence in the South and commemorates one of the Reconstruction period’s most notorious massacres.

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July 30, 2016, marks the 150-year anniversary of the Mechanics’ Institute Riot in New Orleans, Louisiana—though this event should be officially renamed a massacre. What became one of the bloodiest days in the post–Civil War U.S. began as a political convention to discuss black suffrage. The local Republican Party planned the convention at the Mechanics’ Institute and their intention was to work towards amending the 1864 Louisiana Constitution. The meeting was well attended by black Republicans in the city, along with a few white allies, but many whites in New Orleans were opposed to the idea of black suffrage and angry about the proposed convention. Thus on July 30 as a group of supporters paraded towards the Mechanics’ Institute with drum and fife, they were followed by a white mob. That mob was then joined by local police and members of the fire department who helped storm the Mechanics’ Institute and allowed the mob access to the convention-goers, most of whom were unarmed. By the end of the day over forty black Republicans lay dead, along with three white Republican allies and one white rioter. Many of the slain African American men were Union veterans. The violence spread beyond the Mechanics’ Institute as blacks across the city were attacked and their property vandalized. According to the U.S. House Select Committee on the riot, “Scores of colored citizens bear frightful scars more numerous than many soldiers of a dozen well-fought fields can show.”

Image of the Mechanics' Institute Riot

Image from Harper’s Weekly detailing the violence of the Mechanics’ Institute Riot

This white-on-black Reconstruction violence was common in the South. Less than three months before the Mechanics’ Institute Riot in New Orleans was the Memphis Massacre—three days of terror during which white mobs, aided by the police, attacked black men, women, and children. At the end of the Memphis Massacre, 46 African Americans were dead and another 75 injured. The violence in Louisiana would continue long past 1866. Historian Eric Foner identifies the Colfax Massacre of 1873 as “the bloodiest single instance of racial carnage in the Reconstruction era.” That Easter Sunday a white mob overtook and slaughtered much of the Louisiana town’s black militia and residents. The following year in New Orleans a white supremacist group, the White League, forcibly took over the city, disposed the rightful Republican government, and set up their own rogue government. White locals termed this the Battle of Liberty Place, which claimed the lives of members of the White League, the local interracial police force and state militia that fought back, and local blacks targeted by the White League in the aftermath. Continue reading ‘Emily Suzanne Clark: 150 Years After the Mechanics’ Institute Riot’ »

Video: Randy Johnson on the best ways to explore Grandfather Mountain

Headed for an Appalachian vacation this summer? Randy Johnson, author of Grandfather Mountain: The History and Guide to an Appalachian Icon, talks to Charlotte Today about the best ways to explore Grandfather Mountain.

Randy Johnson is an accomplished travel editor and writer. He founded Grandfather Mountain’s modern trail management program in 1978, was backcountry manager until 1990, and serves on Grandfather Mountain State Park’s Advisory Committee. His book, Grandfather Mountain: The History and Guide to an Appalachian Icon, is now available.

Recipe: Caroline and David’s Peach Frozen Yogurt

Savor the South Sampler header image

Peaches cover photo

Every Tuesday this summer we’re featuring a new recipe on the blog from one of our Savor the South® cookbooks. Each little cookbook in our Savor the South® cookbook collection is a big celebration of a beloved food or tradition of the American South. From buttermilk to bourbon, pecans to peaches, bacon to catfish, one by one each volume will stock a kitchen shelf with the flavors and culinary wisdom of this popular American regional cuisine. Written by well-known cooks and food lovers, each book brims with personality, the informative and often surprising culinary and natural history of southern foodways, and a treasure of some fifty recipes—from delicious southern classics to sparkling international renditions that open up worlds of taste for cooks everywhere. You’ll want to collect them all.

Today’s recipe is from Kelly Alexander’s Peaches. Alexander’s work has appeared in the New York Times, Newsweek, and O: The Oprah Magazine.  She is co-author of the New York Times best-selling barbecue cookbook Smokin’ with Myron Mixon. She lives in Chapel Hill, N.C. This peach frozen yogurt is everything you ever loved about summer in one delicious dish!

Don’t forget to “like” the Savor the South® book page on Facebook for more news and recipes. Also, check back here next Tuesday for another Savor the South® Sampler recipe!

Continue reading ‘Recipe: Caroline and David’s Peach Frozen Yogurt’ »

Excerpt: Us Versus Them, by Douglas Little

Cover image of Us Versus ThemIn this important new book, Douglas Little explores the political and cultural turmoil that led U.S. policy makers to shift their attention from containing the “Red Threat” of international communism to combating the “Green Threat” of radical Islam after 1989. Little analyzes America’s confrontation with Islamic extremism through the traditional ideological framework of “us versus them” that has historically pitted the United States against Native Americans, Mexicans, Asian immigrants, Nazis, and the Soviets.

In the following excerpt from Us Versus Them: The United States, Radical Islam, and the Rise of the Green Threat (pp. 15-17), Little outlines the history of “us versus them” thinking that has persisted from the United States’ founding to the modern conflict in the Middle East.

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“Why do they hate us?” When George W. Bush posed this question during a televised address just nine days after the 9/11 attacks, most Americans thought they already knew the answer. Muslim extremists had destroyed the World Trade Center and attacked the Pentagon on 11 September 2001 because they despised America’s Judeo-Christian religious tradition, because they envied America’s economic prosperity and political liberty, and because they resented America’s unmatched military power. Not only do “they hate our freedoms,” Bush intoned, “they want to overthrow existing governments in many Muslim countries” and “drive Israel out of the Middle East.” Simply put, Bush told his listeners, “they stand against us, because we stand in their way.”[1] This was a truth that millions of Americans held to be self-evident at the dawn of the new millennium, when their country’s good intentions and its desire to make the world a better place seemed only to evoke bitter recriminations and acts of unspeakable evil.

Yet although the source of the 9/11 attacks was quite novel and although both the scale and the location of the harm “they” inflicted on “us” were unprecedented, the notion of a virtuous America endangered by wicked and violent enemies was not new at all. Indeed, from the moment that John Winthrop and the Puritans dropped anchor in Massachusetts Bay in 1630 and vowed to build a “City Upon a Hill,” Americans have tended to view the world in terms of “us versus them.” In the beginning, it was Native Americans who mounted the most sinister challenge to Winthrop’s utopian experiment, with Wampanoags and Algonquians and later Seminoles and Sioux defending their turf and terrorizing white settlers. Then, during the nineteenth century, the anxiety generated by the Native American “red threat” would be exacerbated, first by a “black threat” triggered by bloody African slave revolts from the Caribbean to the U.S. South, and later by a “yellow peril” that materialized as hundreds of thousands of Asian immigrants headed east across the Pacific to the United States.

Continue reading ‘Excerpt: Us Versus Them, by Douglas Little’ »

  1. [1] Bush, “Address to the Nation,” 20 September 2001, Public Papers of the Presidents (PPP) Bush 2001, 2:1141–42.

Martha S. Jones: Don’t Miss Out on What Michelle Obama Actually Said in 2008

cover image for Toward an Intellectual History of Black WomenWe welcome the following commentary and book excerpt from Martha S. Jones, co-editor of Toward an Intellectual History of Black Women. Despite recent advances in the study of black thought, black women intellectuals remain often neglected. This collection of essays by fifteen scholars of history and literature establishes black women’s places in intellectual history by engaging the work of writers, educators, activists, religious leaders, and social reformers in the United States, Africa, and the Caribbean. Dedicated to recovering the contributions of thinkers marginalized by both their race and their gender, these essays uncover the work of unconventional intellectuals, both formally educated and self-taught, and explore the broad community of ideas in which their work participated. The end result is a field-defining and innovative volume that addresses topics ranging from religion and slavery to the politicized and gendered reappraisal of the black female body in contemporary culture.

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Don’t let Melania Trump’s Monday night speech be your guide to what Michelle Obama said in 2008. Instead, keep listening. There is more to learn than who borrowed what words. Mrs. Obama’s speech before the Democratic National Convention was more than platitudes and boosterism. She explained for the nation the relationship of black women to the body politic. Mrs. Obama was the daughter of two social movements—women’s suffrage and civil rights—she related. To understand that year’s race between Barack Obama and Hilary Clinton required more than a worn out dichotomy. Race versus gender was a false dividing line, one that black women’s leadership aimed to overcome. It was a lesson in intersectional feminism from the main stage. No less relevant today, it is not one that Mrs. Trump is likely to appropriate any time soon.

Read more about Michelle Obama’s historic summer 2008 speech here in a excerpt (pp. 279–281) from my essay “Histories, Fictions, and Black Womanhood Bodies: Race and Gender in Twenty-First Century Politics.” The full text is available in Toward an Intellectual History of Black Women.

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When Michelle Obama took to the podium at the August 2008 Democratic National Convention (DNC), she came armed with an ambitious arsenal. Her speech drew upon childhood reminiscences, moral philosophy, and her role as a mother and turned on a view of the American dream as produced through struggle and determination. Continue reading ‘Martha S. Jones: Don’t Miss Out on What Michelle Obama Actually Said in 2008’ »

Recipe: Pink-Eyed Peas, Corn, Tomato, and Bacon Salad

Savor the South Sampler header image

Beans and Field Peas cover photo

Every Tuesday this summer we’re featuring a new recipe on the blog from one of our Savor the South® cookbooks. Each little cookbook in our Savor the South® cookbook collection is a big celebration of a beloved food or tradition of the American South. From buttermilk to bourbon, pecans to peaches, bacon to catfish, one by one each volume will stock a kitchen shelf with the flavors and culinary wisdom of this popular American regional cuisine. Written by well-known cooks and food lovers, each book brims with personality, the informative and often surprising culinary and natural history of southern foodways, and a treasure of some fifty recipes—from delicious southern classics to sparkling international renditions that open up worlds of taste for cooks everywhere. You’ll want to collect them all.

Today’s recipe is from Sandra A. Gutierrez’s Beans and Field Peas. Gutierrez is the author of Latin American Street Food and The New Southern–Latino Table. A well-known culinary instructor, she lives in Cary, North Carolina. Follow her on Twitter @sandralatinista. Visit her website sandraskitchenstudio.com. Her recipe today is full of summer (and southern) goodness. What’s not to love about a salad with corn, tomato, and bacon?

Don’t forget to “like” the Savor the South® book page on Facebook for more news and recipes. Also, check back here next Tuesday for another Savor the South® Sampler recipe!

Continue reading ‘Recipe: Pink-Eyed Peas, Corn, Tomato, and Bacon Salad’ »

Excerpt: Boy Soldiers of the American Revolution, by Caroline Cox

Cover image for Boy Soldiers of the American RevolutionBetween 1819 and 1845, as veterans of the Revolutionary War were filing applications to receive pensions for their service, the government was surprised to learn that many of the soldiers were not men, but boys, many of whom were under the age of sixteen, and some even as young as nine. In Boy Soldiers of the American Revolution, Caroline Cox reconstructs the lives and stories of this young subset of early American soldiers, focusing on how these boys came to join the army and what they actually did in service. Giving us a rich and unique glimpse into colonial childhood, Cox traces the evolution of youth in American culture in the late eighteenth century, as the accepted age for children to participate meaningfully in society—not only in the military—was rising dramatically.

In the following excerpt (pp. 52-55), Cox explores the life of a single boy soldier and considers how “a strong desire to enlist” led him to join the army at the age of sixteen.

###

State of Vermont
Probate District of Bradford
in the County of Orange

At a court of Probate held in Bradford in and for the District of Bradford before the Hon. William Spenser Judge of said court—on this 7th day of August 1832 personally appeared in open court before the judge of said court now sitting Samuel Aspenwall a resident of Bradford in the County of Orange and State of Vermont aged sixty six years who first being duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th 1832.

. . . That in the month of March 1782 he joined the company of Captain Allen and a regiment of the Connecticut Militia. [He lists several officers.] That he joined this company as a substitute for one Daniel Hibbard of Windham in the county of Windham and State of Connecticut who was drafted for one year’s service. That he immediately marched to Horse Neck—near the southwest (CHK) corner of Connecticut—to guard the lines from the depredations of the Cowboys—Refugees and Skinners—[loyalists or British troops and thieves foraging from Long Island].[1]

This was all Aspenwall had to say about his enlistment. However, his sister Mary Truman, giving a deposition in support of his claim, remembered the events of that spring vividly. She recalled her brother had “a strong desire to enlist” before he was sixteen (he celebrated that birthday six months after he joined). She listened to family conversations, knew that her father was worried about Samuel catching smallpox or finding his fellow soldiers too rough for a young boy to associate with. She could also remember his return a year later because he came back just as the family welcomed a new baby sister.[2]

*

Perhaps it was like this:

In 1782, Samuel Aspenwall was fifteen years old. He could barely remember a time when his country had not been at war. He had lived all his life in Stonington, Connecticut, and even though it was not the site of any major battles, he had regularly watched the men in his community march off to serve in the Continentals, the state troops, and the militia. They had been fighting since the earliest days of the war. Stonington was only a hundred miles from Boston—close enough to help the Massachusetts militia and other troops respond to the British army’s attacks at Lexington and Concord.

That fateful spring, Aspenwall had only been nine years old, and much of what he knew about the war he learned from stories repeated around the fire at home in the evening. In the intervening years, news of the great events of the day—the defeat of patriot forces in New York and New Jersey in the following two years, the victory of General Horatio Gates at Saratoga, New York, in 1777, and the triumph of General Washington and French General Rochambeau at Yorktown in Virginia in 1781—came to Stonington from a variety of sources. Local men serving in the armed forces wrote letters home, and their families shared the news. The soldiers themselves added details when they returned. And thirdhand reports appeared in the weekly newspaper, which his father or a neighbor occasionally bought in the port town of New London, about fifteen miles away, when they went there on business. Samuel took all this in, sometimes reading the newspaper himself, listening to his parents’ conversations, or being with his father when he met relatives, friends, and neighbors to talk about politics and the war.

Some of the events of the war happened close to home. Since 1776, the British had occupied New York. New London and the neighboring fort at Groton Heights overlooked the mouth of the Connecticut River and Long Island Sound, just a few miles away by water from British forces. There were regular alarms along the coast that required the militia to turn out when enemy ships appeared on the horizon or raiding parties landed hoping to forage supplies. In 1781, the British, led by the traitor Benedict Arnold, had attacked Groton Heights and overwhelmed its outnumbered defenders, killing dozens of men and taking the wounded prisoner. Some of those defenders were from Stonington and neighboring towns, and a few had been boys around Aspenwall’s age.

The following year, he felt he had been on the sidelines long enough. He now had a “Strong desire to enlist” for a year’s term in the Connecticut state troops. He thought his father, a man sympathetic to the patriot cause, would fully support him. But he was wrong. His father vehemently objected; he thought Samuel was too young for the military. He was worried about the boy going far away from home, living a hard soldiers’ life, and keeping rough company. He also knew that many soldiers had contracted smallpox and died in army camps in the early years of the war.

But Samuel was so eager to go that he regarded his father’s disapproval as a temporary stumbling block. A determined fifteen-year-old can be a force to be reckoned with, and Samuel launched a campaign to change his father’s mind. It took so much effort that, decades later, his sister Mary could still remember the regular family discussions about whether her brother could go or not. Finally, their father relented and seized what control he could of the situation. Mary remembered that a couple of weeks before her brother left home, their father arranged for him to be inoculated against smallpox “for the purpose of joining the army with more safety.” Their father was also determined the boy should serve with men who would not corrupt him. Mary recalled her father traveling to the recruiting post with Samuel to make sure he enlisted “in a company agreeable to my father’s mind.” However, no matter what his father’s efforts were on his behalf, the boy was just glad finally to be a soldier.[3]

*

Continue reading ‘Excerpt: Boy Soldiers of the American Revolution, by Caroline Cox’ »

  1. [1] Samuel Aspenwall, W20634, Revolutionary War Pension Applications (RWPA), Record Group (RG) 15, National Archives, Washington, D. C. (NAB).
  2. [2] Ibid.; Painter, Autobiography of Thomas Painter, 9.
  3. [3] This imaginative account is based on Samuel Aspenwall, W20634, RWPA, RG 15, NAB; Buel, Dear Liberty, 36, 272–74; Harris, The Battle of Groton Heights; Martin, Ordinary Courage, 4–6.

Recipe: Shrimp Ceviche

Savor the South Sampler header image

Shrimp cover photo

Every Tuesday this summer we’re featuring a new recipe on the blog from one of our Savor the South® cookbooks. Each little cookbook in our Savor the South® cookbook collection is a big celebration of a beloved food or tradition of the American South. From buttermilk to bourbon, pecans to peaches, bacon to catfish, one by one each volume will stock a kitchen shelf with the flavors and culinary wisdom of this popular American regional cuisine. Written by well-known cooks and food lovers, each book brims with personality, the informative and often surprising culinary and natural history of southern foodways, and a treasure of some fifty recipes—from delicious southern classics to sparkling international renditions that open up worlds of taste for cooks everywhere. You’ll want to collect them all.

Today’s recipe is from Jay Pierce’s ShrimpJay Pierce is chef at The Marshall Free House in Greensboro, North Carolina. He has written for CNN’s Eatocracy blog, Edible Piedmont, Savor NC, and Beer Connoisseur.  Follow him on Twitter @ChefRaconteur. His Shrimp Ceviche recipe is chock-full of Latin flavors and can easily be subbed with other types of fish.

Don’t forget to “like” the Savor the South® book page on Facebook for more news and recipes. Also, check back here next Tuesday for another Savor the South® Sampler recipe!

Continue reading ‘Recipe: Shrimp Ceviche’ »

New Books for Fall 2016!

Fall 2016 seasonal catalog announcement

Summer vacations are great, but fall is our favorite season here at the UNC Press! We’re excited to share some of the great new books scheduled for publication soon. And for those who would rather prolong these summer months, that’s okay, because each one of our fall books is now available for pre-order! To see what’s in store, scroll through the interactive catalog above or visit our website to see what’s new in subject areas that interest you. Most books will be available as e-books, too, at the time of print publication. If you want to stay on top of what’s new each month, sign up for our monthly eNews announcements.

Here’s a sample of what’s in store. Browse our catalog for more great reads to look forward to.

North Carolina’s Roadside Eateries: A Traveler’s Guide to Local Restaurants, Diners, and Barbecue Joints, by D. G. MartinGame Changers: Dean Smith, Charlie Scott, and the Era That Transformed a Southern College Town, by Art ChanskyFamily of Earth: A Southern Mountain Childhood, by Wilma DykemanCurating America: Journeys through Storyscapes of the American Past, by Richard RabinowitzA Field Guide to Antietam: Experiencing the Battlefield through Its History, Places, and People, by Carol Reardon and Tom VosslerLearn to Cook 25 Southern Classics 3 Ways: Traditional, Contemporary, International, by Jennifer BruléThe South in Color: A Visual Journal, by William Ferris

Video: John Shelton Reed, “That’s One Deconstructed Goat”

John Shelton Reed, author of Barbecue: a SAVOR THE SOUTH® cookbook, partnered with the Southern Cultures Center for the Study of the American South to talk about one of his favorite subjects: barbecue.

In the following video, Reed reveals the process of creating barbecued goat from start to finish.

John Shelton Reed lives in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Cofounder of the Campaign for Real Barbecue (TrueCue.org), his many books include Holy Smoke: The Big Book of North Carolina Barbecue, coauthored with Dale Volberg Reed. His book, Barbecue: a SAVOR THE SOUTH® cookbook, is now available. Don’t forget to “like” the Savor the South® page on Facebook for more news and recipes. For recipes by Reed on the UNC Press Blog, see “The Pig Picker: A Barbecue Cocktail” and “Kaycee ‘Red Menace’ Sauce.”