National Technology Day: Recommended Reading List

January 6th marks National Technology Day. Technology has been a huge stepping stone in the advancement of so many cultures. From the technology we use in our everyday lives to NASA’s own technology used for space exploration, it’s always been closely connected to the overall progress of America. In celebration of National Technology Day, we’re… Continue Reading National Technology Day: Recommended Reading List

2022 American Historical Association Annual Meeting

Due to continued concerns surrounding travel and the coronavirus, UNC Press has decided to no longer exhibit in-person at AHA 2022. While we are disappointed to miss this opportunity to see you all at our booth, we hope you’ll take the time to visit our virtual booth. And we hope to see you at AHA… Continue Reading 2022 American Historical Association Annual Meeting

Steel Closets: Setting The Scene

The following is an excerpt from Anne Balay’s Steel Closets: Voices of Gay, Lesbian, and Transgender Steelworkers. Even as substantial legal and social victories are being celebrated within the gay rights movement, much of working-class America still exists outside the current narratives of gay liberation. In Steel Closets, Anne Balay draws on oral history interviews with… Continue Reading Steel Closets: Setting The Scene

Feminism for the Americas: A New Force in the History of the World

The following is an excerpt from Katherine M. Marino’s Feminism for the Americas: The Making of an International Human Rights Movement. This book chronicles the dawn of the global movement for women’s rights in the first decades of the twentieth century. The founding mothers of this movement were not based primarily in the United States,… Continue Reading Feminism for the Americas: A New Force in the History of the World

Universal Human Rights Month: A Recommended Reading List

Nobody’s free until everybody’s free. Fannie Lou Hamer December marks the annual celebration of Universal Human Rights Month. The observance of this month began in 1948 when the U.N. wrote a document called The Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The document was created after World War II and was used to “properly define what human… Continue Reading Universal Human Rights Month: A Recommended Reading List

Pauli Murray: For All My Bravado, Deeply Engrained Notions of Respectability Filled Me With Distress, 1926 – 1940

Recently Pauli Murray: A Personal and Political Life by Troy R. Saxby was selected for North Carolina Reads, North Carolina Humanities’ statewide book club for 2022 that features five books that explore issues of racial, social, and gender equality and the history and culture of North Carolina. To celebrate this accomplishment, we’ve decided to share an excerpt from… Continue Reading Pauli Murray: For All My Bravado, Deeply Engrained Notions of Respectability Filled Me With Distress, 1926 – 1940

UNC Libraries’ Off The Shelf Author Talk with Dr. G. Samantha Rosenthal

Last month, Dr. G. Samantha Rosenthal, author of Living Queer History: Remembrance and Belonging in a Southern City, was featured on UNC Libraries’ Off the Shelf series. Off the Shelf is a collaboration between the University Libraries and UNC Press to present new works on racial and social justice in our history and our world. Queer history is… Continue Reading UNC Libraries’ Off The Shelf Author Talk with Dr. G. Samantha Rosenthal

The Souls of Womenfolk: The Birth of the Enslaved Female Soul

The following is an excerpt from Alexis Wells-Oghoghomeh’s The Souls of Womenfolk: The Religious Cultures of Enslaved Women in the Lower South. This excerpt was taken from chapter one of The Souls of Womenfolk entitled “Georgia Genesis: The Birth of the Enslaved Female Soul”. Wells-Oghoghomeh’s book was also selected as one of Publishers Weekly’s Best Books of 2021 in the Religion/Spirituality… Continue Reading The Souls of Womenfolk: The Birth of the Enslaved Female Soul

Uncontrollable Blackness: The Crucible of Black Criminality

The following is an excerpt from Douglas J. Flowe’s Uncontrollable Blackness: African American Men and Criminality in Jim Crow New York, which recently won the American Historical Association’s 2021 Littleton-Griswold Prize. Early twentieth-century African American men in northern urban centers like New York faced economic isolation, segregation, a biased criminal justice system, and overt racial… Continue Reading Uncontrollable Blackness: The Crucible of Black Criminality

Three UNC Press titles win American Historical Association 2021 Prizes!

Congratulations to these UNC Press titles who were American Historical Association 2021 Prize Winners! The AHA offers annual prizes honoring exceptional books, distinguished teaching and mentoring in the classroom, public history, and other historical projects. Since 1896, the Association has conferred over 1,000 awards. This year’s finalists were selected from a field of over 1,400… Continue Reading Three UNC Press titles win American Historical Association 2021 Prizes!

Mental Illness Awareness Week Reading List

Today’s reading list is focused on mental health as we enter Mental Illness Awareness Week, recognized from October 3rd to October 9th. “Since 1990, when Congress officially established the first full week of October as MIAW, advocates have worked together to sponsor activities, large or small, to educate the public about mental illness.” Below you’ll… Continue Reading Mental Illness Awareness Week Reading List

The Evolution of an Ideal: Servicewomen and Equality in the U.S. Military

The following is a guest blog post by Tanya L. Roth, author of Her Cold War: Women in the U.S. Military, 1945–1980. The 1948 Women’s Armed Services Integration Act created permanent military positions for women with the promise of equal pay. Her Cold War follows the experiences of women in the military from the passage of the Act… Continue Reading The Evolution of an Ideal: Servicewomen and Equality in the U.S. Military

2021 National Women’s Studies Association Annual Meeting

It’s the first weekend of the National Women’s Studies Association virtual annual meeting. We hope you’ll visit our NWSA 2021 virtual booth to browse our new and recent titles, to connect with editor Mark Simpson-Vos, and to learn more about our Gender and American Culture series. New Titles in Women and Gender History from UNC Press Afropolitan Projects: Redefining Blackness,… Continue Reading 2021 National Women’s Studies Association Annual Meeting

Workers’ Rights: A Reading List

Yesterday was Labor Day, “a federal holiday that recognize the American labor movement and the works and contributions of laborers to the development and achievements of the United States.” The very first Labor Day was celebrated in 1882, but, as many of you may know, we’re still fighting for a living wage for all, better working conditions and effective, well-protected workers’… Continue Reading Workers’ Rights: A Reading List

Reproductive Rights, Abortion, and the State of Texas

The following recommended reading list provides deep analysis and historical insight regarding the Texas abortion law ruling (and the ongoing challenges to Roe v. Wade) that has gone into effect as of September 1, 2021. Take 40% off when purchasing these titles direct from uncpress.org using discount promo code 01DAH40 at checkout. Abortion after RoeBy… Continue Reading Reproductive Rights, Abortion, and the State of Texas

New Orleans, A Resilient People: A Reading List

To help the victims of Hurricane Ida, visit these links to learn more about the local organizations who need your financial support in serving those affected: How to Help Hurricane Ida Victims Right Now Want to donate or volunteer to assist those affected by Hurricane Ida? Here’s how to help If you’ve been keeping up… Continue Reading New Orleans, A Resilient People: A Reading List

A Women’s Equality Day Reading List

Happy Women’s Equality Day 2021! From the 1973 Joint Resolution of the United States Congress: Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That August 26, 1973, is designated as ‘Women’s Equality Day’, and the President is authorized and requested to issue a proclamation in commemoration of thatday… Continue Reading A Women’s Equality Day Reading List

Left of Black web series featuring LaKisha Simmons, author of Crescent City Girls: The Lives of Young Black Women in Segregated New Orleans

LaKisha Simmons, author of Crescent City Girls: The Lives of Young Black Women in Segregated New Orleans, was featured on John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute’s Left of Black web series. Left of Black is a web series featuring interviews with Black Studies scholars created and hosted by James B. Duke Distinguished Professor of African and African… Continue Reading Left of Black web series featuring LaKisha Simmons, author of Crescent City Girls: The Lives of Young Black Women in Segregated New Orleans

The New Miss America

The following is a guest blog post by Tanya L. Roth, author of Her Cold War: Women in the U.S. Military, 1945–1980. The 1948 Women’s Armed Services Integration Act created permanent military positions for women with the promise of equal pay. Her Cold War follows the experiences of women in the military from the passage of the… Continue Reading The New Miss America

Mount Vernon’s Virtual Book Talk with Author Tamika Nunley

Tamika Nunley, author of At the Threshold of Liberty: Women, Slavery, and Shifting Identities in Washington, D.C., was featured on Mount Vernon’s virtual book talk series earlier this year. During the talk, Tamika discusses her book, the portrait of Elizabeth Keckley used as the books cover, the tradition of education amongst enslaved people and even… Continue Reading Mount Vernon’s Virtual Book Talk with Author Tamika Nunley