A Volcano in Asheville

Guest blog post by Jonathan Todd Hancock, author of Convulsed States: Earthquakes, Prophecy, and the Remaking of Early America In December 1811, a volcano erupted in Asheville.  An eyewitness named John Edwards reported the disturbing details to the Raleigh newspaper The Star.  After an unusual earthquake, a mountain burned “with great violence,” and cooling lava had dammed up… Continue Reading A Volcano in Asheville

Deer Don’t Eat Camellias and Other Lies I’ve Told Myself

Happy National Pollinator Week! “Pollinator Week is an annual event celebrated internationally in support of pollinator health. “ Guest blog post by Roxann Ward, author of Color-Rich Gardening for the South: A Guide For all Seasons There is nothing more heart-breaking than walking through your garden with a glass of wine at the end of a… Continue Reading Deer Don’t Eat Camellias and Other Lies I’ve Told Myself

African American Children: Some of the Last Recipients of Emancipation

Guest blog post by Crystal Lynn Webster, author of Beyond the Boundaries of Childhood: African American Children in the Antebellum North This author’s book was also featured in part one of our JuneTeenth recommended reading list. Juneteenth is day in which we celebrate freedom. But it is also a recognition that for many African Americans… Continue Reading African American Children: Some of the Last Recipients of Emancipation

Committed: Remembering Native Kinship in and beyond Institutions

Guest blog post by Susan Burch, author of Committed: Remembering Native Kinship in and beyond Institutions “It is said to be the only institution of its kind,” announced the New York Daily Tribune, lauding the opening of the Canton Asylum for Insane Indians in South Dakota in 1902. The appreciation of its exceptionality that the Tribune expressed to its… Continue Reading Committed: Remembering Native Kinship in and beyond Institutions

Giving Up the Blue Stuff: A First Step Toward Organic Gardening

Guest blog post by Roxann Ward, author of Color-Rich Gardening For the South: A Guide for All Seasons The organic gardening discussion has been going on for decades, and in 2021 the availability of organically-grown food is something we take for granted. While it is easy to pick up that container of organic strawberries to… Continue Reading Giving Up the Blue Stuff: A First Step Toward Organic Gardening

Communing with Golf and Nature

Guest blog post by Lee Pace, author of Good Walks: Rediscovering the Soul of Golf at Eighteen of the Carolinas’ Best Courses Howard Lee was an administrator in Governor Jim Hunt’s administration in 1977 when he initiated what would become a walking trail of some 1,200 miles from the North Carolina mountains to the Outer Banks. “To… Continue Reading Communing with Golf and Nature

Reckoning with our past means commemorating violent histories

Reblogged with permission from Washington Post; Blog Post by K. Stephen Prince, author of The Ballad of Robert Charles: Searching For The New Orleans Riot On a gray afternoon in December, a small group gathered in the Central City neighborhood of New Orleans. They came together to dedicate a historical marker to the events of late… Continue Reading Reckoning with our past means commemorating violent histories

Our 2nd New Southern-Latino Table Dinner Party!

Food bloggers try recipes from The New Southern-Latino Table, by Sandra A. Gutierrez: spiced pepitas, causa vegetariana, & chile chocolate brownies Continue Reading Our 2nd New Southern-Latino Table Dinner Party!

John Ernest: Saving Marriages by Divorcing History

Historical recklessness is apparently the new political correctness. Continue Reading John Ernest: Saving Marriages by Divorcing History

Cathleen Cahill on “Not Your Great-Great-Grandmother’s BIA”

Cathleen Cahill writes about changes at the Bureau of Indian Affairs Continue Reading Cathleen Cahill on “Not Your Great-Great-Grandmother’s BIA”

Susan Ware: Happy National Girls and Women in Sports Day!

In celebration of National Girls and Women in Sports Day, we welcome a guest post from Susan Ware, author of Game, Set, Match: Billie Jean King and the Revolution in Women’s Sports.  Ware explains King’s importance in gender equality both within and beyond the world of sports, even before Title IX.  Here, she recalls her… Continue Reading Susan Ware: Happy National Girls and Women in Sports Day!

Sheri Castle’s Italian Sausage and Tortellini Soup

Today’s guest post is edible–Sheri Castle’s recipe for Italian sausage and tortellini soup!  It’s the perfect warm, hearty dish for these chilly months. This is the first in a monthly series of posts in which the author will share delicious, healthy recipes that utilize fresh, local ingredients from her new book, The New Southern Garden… Continue Reading Sheri Castle’s Italian Sausage and Tortellini Soup

Karen L. Cox: The South…In Reality

UNC Press author Karen L. Cox draws from some of my favorite not-so-guilty pleasures in a guest post about representations of the South in reality television and popular culture. Her forthcoming book, Dreaming of Dixie: How the South Was Created in American Popular Culture, examines how entertainment, advertising, and the media construct a romanticized view… Continue Reading Karen L. Cox: The South…In Reality