Category: Native Amer./Indigenous Studies

Miguel La Serna: Peru and the Shining Path: Mission Accomplished?

When Peruvian president Ollanta Humala received the news last week that Florindo Flores Hala, a.k.a. “Comrade Artemio,” had been captured, he immediately set out for the Upper Huallaga Valley to congratulate the security forces responsible for bringing down the Shining Path leader. “In the name of the police and the army we can say to the country: mission accomplished,” affirmed the exultant president. The fall of the rebel leader has many asking: is this the end of Shining Path? Continue Reading Miguel La Serna: Peru and the Shining Path: Mission Accomplished?

Joseph Genetin-Pilawa: “Documented Rights” & Representations of Indigenous History in the Archive

The virtual exhibit “Documented Rights” raises some interesting challenges for scholars and museum professionals alike. It also reminds us that the struggle “for personal rights and freedoms” means something different for Indigenous people. While NARA should be congratulated for its attempt to do some justice to representing the Native experience, “Documented Rights” sheds light on the difficulty of doing so without replicating settler-colonial/archival patterns of organizing, categorizing, and flattening those histories. Continue Reading Joseph Genetin-Pilawa: “Documented Rights” & Representations of Indigenous History in the Archive

The Lost History of the Cherokee Freedmen Controversy

Today, over at the First Peoples blog, UNC Press author Celia Naylor writes about the history and current events surrounding the Cherokee freedmen controversy. In particular, she draws our attention to the historical import of the Dawes Commission, especially as regards sovereignty, race, and citizenship. Continue Reading The Lost History of the Cherokee Freedmen Controversy

Rose Stremlau: History’s Definition of an American Family

The majority of human civilizations across time and place have not organized themselves into nuclear family units based on monogamous, heterosexual coupling. Native North American societies provide hundreds of alternative examples. Continue Reading Rose Stremlau: History’s Definition of an American Family

Congratulations to Tiya Miles, 2011 MacArthur Fellow

We’re thrilled to offer our heartiest congratulations to historian Tiya Miles for being awarded a 2011 MacArthur Foundation Fellowship (aka the “Genius Grant”). Miles is the author of “The House on Diamond Hill: A Cherokee Plantation Story”. From the announcement: “A scholar of range and promise, and increasingly an authoritative voice in reframing and reinterpreting the history of our diverse nation, Miles is adding texture and depth to the mosaic that was our shared past and that is our heritage.” Continue Reading Congratulations to Tiya Miles, 2011 MacArthur Fellow

Encouraging selfishness on the reservation: An excerpt from Cahill’s Federal Fathers & Mothers

The commissioner of Indian affairs urged that “[the Indian] must be imbued with the exalting egotism of American civilization so that he will say ‘I’ instead of ‘We’ and ‘This is mine’ instead of ‘This is ours.'” Continue Reading Encouraging selfishness on the reservation: An excerpt from Cahill’s Federal Fathers & Mothers

EPIC SALE TIME!!

It’s EPIC SALE TIME! Over 700 UNC Press books are on sale! Read more about the huge deals here. Continue Reading EPIC SALE TIME!!

Listen: Phillip Round on Native American Literature

Phillip Round, author of Removable Type: Histories of the Book in Indian Country, 1663-1880, recently sat down for an interview on Iowa Public Radio. He joined American Indian studies lecturer James Coppoc and short story author Eddie Chuculate to discuss the history and current state of Native American literature. Beyond his broad knowledge on Native American literacy and printed word… Continue Reading Listen: Phillip Round on Native American Literature

Malinda Lowery on Giving Thanks in a Native Way

Malinda Maynor Lowery, author of Lumbee Indians in the Jim Crow South, shares a personal Thanksgiving story over at FemCentral, the Virtual Institute for Women: “Ooh, I’m going to spend Thanksgiving with the Indians!,” joked a co-worker of mine one autumn afternoon in the late 1990s. He and I were crewmates on one of my short documentary films which discussed… Continue Reading Malinda Lowery on Giving Thanks in a Native Way

Southern Gateways: The best in southern reading from UNC Press

One of the strengths of UNC Press is our commitment to publishing first-rate books about the region in which we live. From college hoops to environmental history, from the Civil War to the Civil Rights Movement, from the coast to the hills, our books about the South educate and entertain readers within the region and beyond. We’ve recently updated our… Continue Reading Southern Gateways: The best in southern reading from UNC Press

Sport, Religion, and Native Identity

Michael Zogry, author of Anetso, the Cherokee Ball Game: At the Center of Ceremony and Identity guest blogs over at First Peoples, New Directions today about anetso, the precursor to field lacrosse which blends sport, religious ritual, and cultural identity. An excerpt: Throughout the first decade of the twenty-first century, certain members of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Nation have… Continue Reading Sport, Religion, and Native Identity

Malinda Maynor Lowery Named One of HNN’s Top Young Historians

Congratulations to Malinda Maynor Lowery, author of Lumbee Indians in the Jim Crow South: Race, Identity, and the Making of a Nation, who was recently named one of History News Network’s Top Young Historians. HNN’s feature on Lowery includes a list of professional accomplishments (did you know she has produced award-winning documentary films?) as well as a personal statement from… Continue Reading Malinda Maynor Lowery Named One of HNN’s Top Young Historians

“We Are Standing on Beautiful History”

Today we welcome a guest post from Tiya Miles, author of The House on Diamond Hill: A Cherokee Plantation Story. Last weekend she attended a gathering to celebrate the historic plantation home and held a signing event for her new book. Over the course of her day, past and present were juxtaposed in an experience that truly gave life to… Continue Reading “We Are Standing on Beautiful History”

On the Iroquois Lacrosse Team, Sovereignty, and Sport

Last week we watched with interest as a significant story unfolded with the Iroquois Nationals lacrosse team. As they attempted to travel to the UK for international competition, they were entangled in a visa dispute. Although the team traveled internationally just a couple years ago using their Iroquois passports, British authorities refused to admit them to the UK this time… Continue Reading On the Iroquois Lacrosse Team, Sovereignty, and Sport

Malinda Maynor Lowery: Troubles Decolonizing a Colonial History

Lumbee Indians in the Jim Crow South: Race, Identity, and the Making of a Nation is one of the inaugural books in the multi-press collaborative series First Peoples, New Directions in Indigenous Studies. In a guest post for the First Peoples blog, author Malinda Maynor Lowery (Lumbee) writes about how she continues to navigate the effects of colonialism in her… Continue Reading Malinda Maynor Lowery: Troubles Decolonizing a Colonial History