Schomburg Center’s Conversations in Black Freedom Studies Series, “Understanding Policing and Surveillance in America” with Daniel S. Chard, Victoria Law, Marisol LeBrón and Stuart Schrader

Last week, the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture hosted a conversation titled “Understanding Policing and Surveillance in America” for their Conversations in Black Freedom Studies series. Moderated by Dr. Jeanne Theoharis and Dr. Robyn C. Spencer, UNC Press author of Nixon’s War At Home: The FBI, Leftist Guerrillas, and the Origins of Counterterrorism Daniel S.… Continue Reading Schomburg Center’s Conversations in Black Freedom Studies Series, “Understanding Policing and Surveillance in America” with Daniel S. Chard, Victoria Law, Marisol LeBrón and Stuart Schrader

The Punitive Turn in American Life: How the United States Learned to Fight Crime Like a War

Guest blog post by Michael S. Sherry, author of The Punitive Turn in American Life: How the United States Learned to Fight Crime Like a War Advertisements urging civilians to buy guns captured how the punitive turn had played out by the 2010s. “As Close as You Can Get [to war] without Enlisting” ran one… Continue Reading The Punitive Turn in American Life: How the United States Learned to Fight Crime Like a War

Steve Estes: Cameras and Cops

By the 1980s, the Charleston police department and departments around the country were deployed to fight two “wars” on the home front. They fought a war on crime, of course, but also on drugs. Thinking about policing as war and civilians as the enemy led to a crackdown on impoverished urban minority communities the likes of which the country had never seen before. Continue Reading Steve Estes: Cameras and Cops