Fiona Ritchie: Living Is Collecting

When NPR first partnered with me in presenting The Thistle & Shamrock®, we talked about using my radio show to open a doorway into a world of evolving Celtic music traditions for public radio listeners. I could never have imagined how far that door would swing open my way, too, helping inspire my search for the depth of connection that underpins our migration story in Wayfaring Strangers.

Excerpt: Talkin’ Tar Heel, by Walt Wolfram and Jeffrey Reaser

A worker in the Bank of America Corporate Center in Charlotte who asks you to “mash the button” for the elevator or to “he’p him tote the computer right yonder” would get a quizzical look or a patronizing chuckle for “talking country” in the towering edifice representing the second-largest financial center in the United States. But those who react in condescension may not realize that this way of speaking was the dialect norm in the city just a couple of generations ago—and probably in the residential home that once stood on this site. As one elderly Charlotte resident, born in 1919, recalled: “I remember when Discovery Place was just a little neighborhood store.”

North Carolina Icons: Appalachian Trail, Part 3: Food, Culture, Traditions

Our North Carolina icons feature this week focuses on food, games, and culture of the Appalachian region.

Altina L. Waller: The Hatfield-McCoy Feud

What is missing here is any social and economic context. True, the Civil War is the film’s encompassing social explanation, but it leaves me wondering why the set of social and economic circumstances that confronted folks in post war Appalachia is completely ignored. In the Tug Valley, as in all Appalachia and even the entire South, economic decline was a serious threat to almost everyone.

The History of the Hatfield-McCoy Feud

The History Channel will be airing a three-part miniseries about the Hatfield and McCoy families starting on Memorial Day. The miniseries stars Kevin Costner, Bill Paxton, Mare Winningham, and lots and lots of guns and violence. Historian Altina L. Waller, author of Feud: Hatfields, McCoys, and Social Change in Appalachia, 1860-1900, was interviewed extensively for the accompanying documentary to the miniseries.

Interview: Jennifer Frick-Ruppert on Appalachian ecology

There are about 35 million acres of beautiful mountains that extend from northern Virginia down to north Georgia. They’ve been going through a glorious transformation of color over the last few weeks. If you’ve never visited the Appalachians in fall, you’re missing out on a breathtaking treat from nature. In Mountain Nature: A Seasonal Natural …

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Southern Cultures journal now available for Kindle

We are delighted to announce that new and recent issues of the popular journal Southern Cultures are now available in ebook format. Light up your Kindle with the spring 2010 issue, the summer 2010 special “southern lives” issue, and the fall 2010 special roots music issue. (Check out all three issues at the UNC Press …

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What is Decoration Day?

Alan Jabbour, who authored Decoration Day in the Mountains: Traditions of Cemetery Decoration in the Southern Appalachians with his wife Karen Singer Jabbour, provides some insight to a grassroots ritual that led to the creation of a federal holiday. –alyssa Many rural community cemeteries in western North Carolina hold “decorations.” A decoration is a religious …

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Earth Day in the Southern Appalachians

On April 22, 1970, the first Earth Day celebrations and teach-ins were held in Philadelphia, PA. Over the forty years since then, Earth Day has spread throughout the United States and around the globe, becoming an observed event in almost every nation worldwide. To recognize this important day, UNC Press would like to welcome author …

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To Right These Wrongs: A Groundbreaking Project

The first few books from UNC Press’ Spring|Summer 2010 catalog made it to bookshelves this month, and many more will be debuting in the coming months. One of the books we’re excited to publish, in partnership with Publishing the Long Civil Rights Movement, is Robert R. Korstad and James L. Leloudis’ To Right These Wrongs: …

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8-year-old Fan Gives Molly Whuppie Two Thumbs Up

We love fan mail here at UNC Press. Who doesn’t, right? Fan mail from kids is extra awesome, though. Here’s something that really made our day recently. Eight-year-old Sydney C., of Asheville, North Carolina, was one of the guests at last month’s Asheville book party (which Rachel has blogged about). Sydney met Press authors Foy …

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National Young Readers Week

Creating lifetime readers is the goal and it’s all thanks to Pizza Hut. Wait, what? That’s right, you read me correctly. National Young Readers Week is an annual event that was co-founded in 1989 by Pizza Hut and the Center for the Book in the Library of Congress. Pizza Hut created The BOOK IT! Program …

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