Understanding Afghanistan’s Past: A Reading List

Some of you may be fully aware of what’s going on in Afghanistan right now, but for those who aren’t or would like to learn more information about what lead up to the recent events in Afghanistan, we’ve created a recommended reading list detailing some events that shaped the country into what it is today.… Continue Reading Understanding Afghanistan’s Past: A Reading List

Palm Oil’s Industrial Past Illuminates its Ubiquity Today

The following is a guest blog post by Jonathan E. Robins, author of Oil Palm: A Global History. By telling the story of the oil palm across multiple centuries and continents, Robins demonstrates how the fruits of an African palm tree became a key commodity in the story of global capitalism, beginning in the eras… Continue Reading Palm Oil’s Industrial Past Illuminates its Ubiquity Today

The Roanoke Voyages (1584-1590), Fourth of Five Roanoke Voyages with Emphasis on Geographic Naming

The following is the sixth segment of a guest blog post series by Roger L. Payne, author of The Outer Banks Gazetteer: The History of Place Names from Carova to Emerald Isle. A book over twenty years in the making, The Outer Banks Gazetteer is a comprehensive reference guide to the region’s place names—over 3,000 entries in all. Click here… Continue Reading The Roanoke Voyages (1584-1590), Fourth of Five Roanoke Voyages with Emphasis on Geographic Naming

UNC Asheville Re-imagines the Humanities Core: A Data-Driven, Student-Centered and Community-Led Curriculum Revision that Goes Beyond Traditional Textbooks

The following reblog from UNC Asheville discusses their publishing partnership with UNC Press on their humanities readers (both print and open access). Thanks for recognizing our Office of Scholarly Publishing Services, and for citing the Ross Fund. The two faculty leading UNC Asheville’s Humanities readers revisions often compare the project to an elephant. It’s large.… Continue Reading UNC Asheville Re-imagines the Humanities Core: A Data-Driven, Student-Centered and Community-Led Curriculum Revision that Goes Beyond Traditional Textbooks

An Unexpected Mechanism of Native Dispossession

The following is a guest blog post by Jonathan Todd Hancock, author of Convulsed States: Earthquakes, Prophecy, and the Remaking of Early America. Through varied peoples’ efforts to come to grips with the New Madrid earthquakes, Hancock reframes early nineteenth-century North America as a site where all of its inhabitants wrestled with fundamental human questions… Continue Reading An Unexpected Mechanism of Native Dispossession

Happy National Water Quality Month! A Recommended Reading List

Did you know “Every year, more people die from unsafe water than from all forms of violence, including war”? With statistics like that, spreading the knowledge behind National Water Quality Month is a necessity. Most communities affected by unsafe water were never cared for from the beginning, so it’s important that those who have the means fight… Continue Reading Happy National Water Quality Month! A Recommended Reading List

Revisiting the Aitken Bible

The following is a guest blog post by Katherine Carté, author of Religion and the American Revolution: An Imperial History, published by the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture and the University of North Carolina Press. Sweeping and explicitly transatlantic, Religion and the American Revolution demonstrates that if religion helped set the terms through which Anglo-Americans… Continue Reading Revisiting the Aitken Bible

The Roanoke Voyages (1584-1590), Third of Five Roanoke Voyages with Emphasis on Geographic Naming

The following is the fifth segment of a guest blog post series by Roger L. Payne, author of The Outer Banks Gazetteer: The History of Place Names from Carova to Emerald Isle. A book over twenty years in the making, The Outer Banks Gazetteer is a comprehensive reference guide to the region’s place names—over 3,000 entries in all. Click… Continue Reading The Roanoke Voyages (1584-1590), Third of Five Roanoke Voyages with Emphasis on Geographic Naming

George Gordon Meade: Unsung Hero of the Gettysburg Campaign

The following is a guest blog post by Kent Masterson Brown, author of Meade at Gettysburg: A Study in Command. Commentators often dismiss Meade when discussing the great leaders of the Civil War. But in this long-anticipated book, Kent Masterson Brown draws on an expansive archive to reappraise Meade’s leadership during the Battle of Gettysburg. … Continue Reading George Gordon Meade: Unsung Hero of the Gettysburg Campaign

2021 American Sociological Association Annual Meeting

We hope you’ll visit our virtual booth for the 2021 American Sociological Association Annual Meeting! A Message from Senior Editor Lucas Church: Welcome to our virtual exhibit! Normally, I’d be there to greet you in-person, show you our wonderful titles, and to talk about your own book project. I do hope we can all see each other… Continue Reading 2021 American Sociological Association Annual Meeting

The New Miss America

The following is a guest blog post by Tanya L. Roth, author of Her Cold War: Women in the U.S. Military, 1945–1980. The 1948 Women’s Armed Services Integration Act created permanent military positions for women with the promise of equal pay. Her Cold War follows the experiences of women in the military from the passage of the… Continue Reading The New Miss America

The Roanoke Voyages (1584-1590), Second of Five Roanoke Voyages with Emphasis on Geographic Naming

The following is the fourth segment of a guest blog post series by Roger L. Payne, author of The Outer Banks Gazetteer: The History of Place Names from Carova to Emerald Isle. A book over twenty years in the making, The Outer Banks Gazetteer is a comprehensive reference guide to the region’s place names—over 3,000 entries in all. Click… Continue Reading The Roanoke Voyages (1584-1590), Second of Five Roanoke Voyages with Emphasis on Geographic Naming

The Shot Heard Round The World

The following is a guest blog post by Robert G. Parkinson, author of Thirteen Clocks: How Race United the Colonies and Made the Declaration of Independence, published by the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture and the University of North Carolina Press. In Thirteen Clocks, Parkinson argues that patriot leaders used racial prejudices to persuade… Continue Reading The Shot Heard Round The World

UNC Press August 2021 Author Events

Jason VuicThe Swamp PeddlersMonday, August 2, 2021 | 6:00pm ETMid County Regional Library, Port Charlotte (in person) Michael TwittyRiceMonday, August 2, 2021 | 7:00pm ETAlexandria Library Jason VuicThe Swamp PeddlersTuesday, August 3, 2021 | 5:30pm ETCape Coral Historical Museum (in person) Adrian MillerBlack SmokeWednesday, August 4, 2021 | 6:30pm MTBoulder Book Store (in person) Jason VuicThe Swamp PeddlersWednesday,… Continue Reading UNC Press August 2021 Author Events

Celebrity and Crazy

The following is a guest blog post by Carolyn Eastman, author of The Strange Genius of Mr. O: The World of the United States’ First Forgotten Celebrity, published by the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture and the University of North Carolina Press. The Strange Genius of Mr. O. is the biography of… Continue Reading Celebrity and Crazy

The Last News Story of Colonial America

Guest blog post by Robert G. Parkinson, author of Thirteen Clocks: How Race United the Colonies and Made the Declaration of Independence What was the tipping point that pushed Americans into taking the step of declaring their independence? After all, the colonies had been at war with Britain for more than a year by the end… Continue Reading The Last News Story of Colonial America

“Colored Conventions Show Us Where Democracy Really Happens”, Democracy Works Podcast featuring P. Gabrielle Foreman and Jim Casey

In April, P. Gabrielle Foreman and Jim Casey, contributors to The Colored Conventions Movement: Black Organizing in the Nineteenth Century, were featured on Penn State’s Democracy Works podcast. If you’re not already familiar with these two, they’ve been doing some incredible work to detail the history of The Colored Conventions movement, the nineteenth century’s longest campaign for… Continue Reading “Colored Conventions Show Us Where Democracy Really Happens”, Democracy Works Podcast featuring P. Gabrielle Foreman and Jim Casey

Unruly Bodies: tyranny of the visual

This week we’re sharing an excerpt from Susannah B. Mintz’s Unruly Bodies: Life Writing by Women with Disabilities to celebrate Disability Pride Month. The excerpt is titled tyranny of the visual, written by Lucy Grealy and Georgina Kleege. Earlier this month we published a recommended reading list featuring Mintz’s Unruly Bodies and other titles highlighting… Continue Reading Unruly Bodies: tyranny of the visual

The Roanoke Voyages (1584-1590), First of Five Roanoke Voyages with Emphasis on Geographic Naming – Part 2

The third segment of a guest blog post series by Roger L. Payne, author of The Outer Banks Gazetteer: The History of Place Names from Carova to Emerald Isle. Click here to view Roger Payne’s entire guest blog series. A continuation of the incidents and information regarding the first Roanoke Voyage. It cannot be confirmed that… Continue Reading The Roanoke Voyages (1584-1590), First of Five Roanoke Voyages with Emphasis on Geographic Naming – Part 2

OTD: Why we should remember July 20, 1775

Guest blog post by Katherine Carté, author of Religion and the American Revolution: An Imperial History John Adams described the American Revolution as a time when “thirteen clocks were made to strike together” when he reflected on the era in 1818. Though he did not say it, if that description could be applied to a… Continue Reading OTD: Why we should remember July 20, 1775