Data Denial and America’s Epistemic Crisis

Guest blog post by Stephen Berry, author of Count the Dead: Coroners, Quants, and the Birth of Death as We Know It. In Count the Dead, Stephen Berry shows how a network of coroners, court officials, and state and federal authorities developed methods to track and reveal patterns of dying. These officials harnessed these records… Continue Reading Data Denial and America’s Epistemic Crisis

World Bee Day: A Pollinator Gardening Reading List

Happy World Bee Day! To raise awareness of the importance of pollinators, the threats they face, and their contribution to sustainable development, the United Nations designated 20 May as World Bee Day. The following reading list features reference books that offer specific guidance on how to select and tend to plants that will attract more bees… Continue Reading World Bee Day: A Pollinator Gardening Reading List

South Writ Large: Recognizing Lumbee History through Land

Distributed for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Center for the Study of the American South, South Writ Large: Stories from the Global South is an anthology of articles published over the past ten years in the online magazine South Writ Large, featuring personal essays, articles, poetry, and artwork that explores the culture of the… Continue Reading South Writ Large: Recognizing Lumbee History through Land

Russia’s War in Ukraine Undermines the Real Meaning behind the 9th of May Anniversary Celebrations

Guest blog post by Natalia Telepneva, author of Cold War Liberation: The Soviet Union and the Collapse of the Portuguese Empire in Africa, 1961–1975. We are proud to offer Cold War Liberation in our usual print and ebook formats, plus as an open-access edition available through the Sustainable History Monograph Project. ‘My greatest wish for… Continue Reading Russia’s War in Ukraine Undermines the Real Meaning behind the 9th of May Anniversary Celebrations

Celebrating a Century of Excellence: The University of North Carolina Press Turns 100, Part One

2022 marks the one hundred year anniversary of the founding of the University of North Carolina Press. This first blog post of a series of five is taken from an essay on the history of UNC Press written by Advancement Council member the Rev. David C. (Kirk) Brown, first delivered to the Pen and Plate Club… Continue Reading Celebrating a Century of Excellence: The University of North Carolina Press Turns 100, Part One

AAPI Heritage Month 2022 Reading List

Happy Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month! The following reading list highlights titles covering a broad array of Asian American and Pacific Islander histories and topics, ranging from immigration and politics, to the performing arts, and the impact of climate change on the AAPI community. Arise, Africa! Roar, China!: Black and Chinese Citizens of… Continue Reading AAPI Heritage Month 2022 Reading List

Curator Conversations: Berkley Hudson on Mr. Pruitt’s Possum Town

Thanks to Curatorial for allowing us to reblog the following Q&A with Berkley Hudson that originally appeared on their website. Hudson describes how a recent exhibition of O.N. Pruitt’s photography, along with its companion book published by UNC Press in partnership with Duke University’s Center for Documentary Studies, O.N. Pruitt’s Possum Town: Photographing Trouble and… Continue Reading Curator Conversations: Berkley Hudson on Mr. Pruitt’s Possum Town

Romare Bearden in the Homeland of His Imagination

Happy publication day to Glenda Gilmore’s Romare Bearden in the Homeland of His Imagination, a Ferris and Ferris Book. Romare Bearden (1911–1988), one of the most prolific, original, and acclaimed American artists of the twentieth century, richly depicted scenes and figures rooted in the American South and the Black experience. Bearden hailed from North Carolina but was… Continue Reading Romare Bearden in the Homeland of His Imagination

UNC Press 100th Anniversary Celebration Remarks by John Sherer

On March 25th, UNC Press held its first in-person, public celebration of the anniversary of our centennial year at the Chapel Hill Public Library. The following is an edited version of the speech given by Spangler Family Director John Sherer that evening. I try to keep up on trends in university presses, so I do… Continue Reading UNC Press 100th Anniversary Celebration Remarks by John Sherer

Writing the History of Legal Abortion

The following is an excerpt from 2015’s Abortion after Roe by Johanna Schoen, recipient of the William H. Welch Medal from the American Association for the History of Medicine. Schoen sheds light on the little-studied experience of performing and receiving abortion care from the 1970s–a period of optimism–to the rise of the antiabortion movement and… Continue Reading Writing the History of Legal Abortion

An Edible North Carolina History

Available today wherever ebooks and books are sold, Edible North Carolina: A Journey across a State of Flavor edited by Marcie Cohen Ferris shows how culinary excellence, entrepreneurship, and the struggle for racial justice converge in shaping food equity, not only for North Carolinians, but for all Americans. Starting with Vivian Howard, star of PBS’s A… Continue Reading An Edible North Carolina History

Glenda Gilmore Discusses “Romare Bearden in the Homeland of His Imagination”

The last of Spring 2022’s UNC-Chapel Hill and UNC Press’s ongoing Off the Shelf speaker series featured Glenda Gilmore discussing her new book, Romare Bearden in the Homeland of His Imagination: An Artist’s Reckoning with the South (on sale May 10, 2022). Watch the archived virtual discussion between Gilmore and Aaron Smithers, UNC-Chapel Hill Special… Continue Reading Glenda Gilmore Discusses “Romare Bearden in the Homeland of His Imagination”

Congratulations to 2022 Carnegie Fellows George Derek Musgrove and Monica M. White

Hearty congratulations to UNC Press authors Monica M. White, author of Freedom Farmers: Agricultural Resistance and the Black Freedom Movement, and George Derek Musgrove, co-author of Chocolate City: A History of Race and Democracy in the Nation’s Capital, both part of the 2022 cohort of Andrew Carnegie Fellows. About the Carnegie Fellows: The Andrew Carnegie… Continue Reading Congratulations to 2022 Carnegie Fellows George Derek Musgrove and Monica M. White

Detroit and Toxic Debt

Today marks eight years since the beginning of the ongoing Flint water contamination crisis. The following is an excerpt from Toxic Debt: An Environmental Justice History of Detroit by Josiah Rector, officially on sale tomorrow wherever ebooks and books are sold. Between 2014 and 2019, the City of Detroit shut off water for over 141,000… Continue Reading Detroit and Toxic Debt

The Epic Political Battle Over the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

Happy Earth Day 2022 The following excerpt is taken from Finis Dunaway’s Defending the Arctic Refuge: A Photographer, an Indigenous Nation, and a Fight for Environmental Justice, winner the 2022 Spur Award for Contemporary Nonfiction by the Western Writers of America. I don’t make a habit of going to funerals, especially for people I’ve never… Continue Reading The Epic Political Battle Over the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

From Unquestioned Obedience to Disintegrating Abeyance: Children’s Toys and U.S.’s Racial Order in the Late 19th Century

The following guest blog post by Mahshid Mayar, author of Citizens and Rulers of the World: The American Child and the Cartographic Pedagogies of Empire, is an edited version of an essay originally published under the title “Verbs of Violence 19th-Century Jigsaw Puzzles, Otherness, and American Childhood” in the Journal of the History of Childhood… Continue Reading From Unquestioned Obedience to Disintegrating Abeyance: Children’s Toys and U.S.’s Racial Order in the Late 19th Century

In Memoriam: Lindley S. Butler

We are saddened by the news that Lindley S. Butler died April 12, 2022, after a period of declining health. UNC Press was able to provide Butler with advance copies of his final book, A History of North Carolina in the Proprietary Era, 1629-1729 (on sale 5/17/22), in recent weeks, and he was able to… Continue Reading In Memoriam: Lindley S. Butler

The Territories of Elaine Maisner

Executive editor Elaine Maisner retired earlier this month after 28 years working at UNC Press. The following guest blog post is by Laurent Dubois, John L. Nau III Bicentennial Professor in the History & Principles of Democracy and Director for Academic Affairs of the Democracy Initiative at the University of Virginia. Dubois is also the… Continue Reading The Territories of Elaine Maisner

George Moses Horton, the Black Bard of North Carolina

Happy National Poetry Month! For our centennial year, we are highlighting iconic publications from our past, including today’s excerpted poem taken from The Black Bard of North Carolina: George Moses Horton and His Poetry, edited by Joan R. Sherman, which collects sixty-two of Horton’s poems. Enslaved from birth until the close of the Civil War, the… Continue Reading George Moses Horton, the Black Bard of North Carolina

Richard Strand’s Play, “Ben Butler”

The following is a guest blog post by Elizabeth D. Leonard, author of Benjamin Franklin Butler: A Noisy, Fearless Life. Benjamin Franklin Butler was one of the most important and controversial military and political leaders of the Civil War and Reconstruction eras. Remembered most often for his uncompromising administration of the Federal occupation of New Orleans… Continue Reading Richard Strand’s Play, “Ben Butler”