The Souls of Womenfolk: The Birth of the Enslaved Female Soul

The following is an excerpt from Alexis Wells-Oghoghomeh’s The Souls of Womenfolk: The Religious Cultures of Enslaved Women in the Lower South. This excerpt was taken from chapter one of The Souls of Womenfolk entitled “Georgia Genesis: The Birth of the Enslaved Female Soul”. Wells-Oghoghomeh’s book was also selected as one of Publishers Weekly’s Best Books of 2021 in the Religion/Spirituality… Continue Reading The Souls of Womenfolk: The Birth of the Enslaved Female Soul

Uncontrollable Blackness: The Crucible of Black Criminality

The following is an excerpt from Douglas J. Flowe’s Uncontrollable Blackness: African American Men and Criminality in Jim Crow New York, which recently won the American Historical Association’s 2021 Littleton-Griswold Prize. Early twentieth-century African American men in northern urban centers like New York faced economic isolation, segregation, a biased criminal justice system, and overt racial… Continue Reading Uncontrollable Blackness: The Crucible of Black Criminality

“Flyleaf: The Wilmington Ten”, NC Department of Natural & Cultural Resources’ Monthly Facebook Live Conversation Featuring Dr. Kenneth Robert Janken and Mr. Sean Palmer

Earlier in October, the North Carolina Department of Natural & Cultural Resources’ hosted their monthly Flyleaf Facebook Live conversation with UNC Press author Kenneth Robert Janken and UNC Wilmington’s Director of the Upperman African American Cultural Center Sean Palmer. Palmer and Janken discussed Janken’s book The Wilmington Ten: Violence, Injustice, and the Rise of Black… Continue Reading “Flyleaf: The Wilmington Ten”, NC Department of Natural & Cultural Resources’ Monthly Facebook Live Conversation Featuring Dr. Kenneth Robert Janken and Mr. Sean Palmer

Schomburg Center’s Conversations in Black Freedom Studies Series, “Understanding Policing and Surveillance in America” with Daniel S. Chard, Victoria Law, Marisol LeBrón and Stuart Schrader

Last week, the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture hosted a conversation titled “Understanding Policing and Surveillance in America” for their Conversations in Black Freedom Studies series. Moderated by Dr. Jeanne Theoharis and Dr. Robyn C. Spencer, UNC Press author of Nixon’s War At Home: The FBI, Leftist Guerrillas, and the Origins of Counterterrorism Daniel S.… Continue Reading Schomburg Center’s Conversations in Black Freedom Studies Series, “Understanding Policing and Surveillance in America” with Daniel S. Chard, Victoria Law, Marisol LeBrón and Stuart Schrader

Cuban Memory Wars: An Evening with Michael Bustamante

Back in April, author of Cuban Memory Wars: Retrospective Politics in Revolution and Exile, Michael J. Bustamante held a virtual talk in partnership with Books & Books and The Cuban Research Institute. In this talk, Bustamante speaks with Dr. Jorge Duany, the Director of the Cuban Research Institute and Professor of Anthropology in the Department… Continue Reading Cuban Memory Wars: An Evening with Michael Bustamante

Mental Illness Awareness Week Reading List

Today’s reading list is focused on mental health as we enter Mental Illness Awareness Week, recognized from October 3rd to October 9th. “Since 1990, when Congress officially established the first full week of October as MIAW, advocates have worked together to sponsor activities, large or small, to educate the public about mental illness.” Below you’ll… Continue Reading Mental Illness Awareness Week Reading List

Center for Political Education’s “Writing the Third World” series with UNC Press Author Johanna Fernández and Nadya Tannous

In celebration of National Hispanic/Latinx Heritage Month, we’ve decided to share a virtual conversation hosted by the Center for Political Education featuring UNC Press author Johanna Fernández and Nadya Tannous from the Palestinian Youth Movement. Johanna Fernández is the author of The Young Lords: A Radical History. Utilizing oral histories, archival records, and an enormous… Continue Reading Center for Political Education’s “Writing the Third World” series with UNC Press Author Johanna Fernández and Nadya Tannous

UNC Press author Michael Twitty speaks with Jessica B. Harris and JJ Johnson on New York Botanical Garden’s “The Food Dialogues” series

In June, Michael Twitty, author of Rice: a Savor the South cookbook, had a virtual conversation with award-winning scholar Jessica B. Harris and James Beard Award-winning chef JJ Johnson. The conversation was for New York Botanical Garden’s “The Food Dialogues”, a series of rich conversations with prominent authors, chefs, and food historians that re-examines and… Continue Reading UNC Press author Michael Twitty speaks with Jessica B. Harris and JJ Johnson on New York Botanical Garden’s “The Food Dialogues” series

The Haitians: The Persistence of the Vocabulary of the Slavers

The following excerpt is from “The Persistence of the Vocabulary of the Slavers” in Jean Casimir’s book The Haitians: A Decolonial History. In this sweeping history, leading Haitian intellectual Jean Casimir argues that the story of Haiti should not begin with the usual image of Saint-Domingue as the richest colony of the eighteenth century. Rather,… Continue Reading The Haitians: The Persistence of the Vocabulary of the Slavers

Workers’ Rights: A Reading List

Yesterday was Labor Day, “a federal holiday that recognize the American labor movement and the works and contributions of laborers to the development and achievements of the United States.” The very first Labor Day was celebrated in 1882, but, as many of you may know, we’re still fighting for a living wage for all, better working conditions and effective, well-protected workers’… Continue Reading Workers’ Rights: A Reading List

Author Jean Casimir’s virtual lecture with The Institute of European Studies

Jean Casimir, author of The Haitians: A Decolonial History, gave a virtual lecture back in May at The Institute of European Studies. Casimir, who served as Haitian ambassador to the United States and as a United Nations official, is professor of humanities at the University of Haiti. In this lecture, Jean discusses the Haitian Revolution… Continue Reading Author Jean Casimir’s virtual lecture with The Institute of European Studies

Understanding Haiti’s Past: A Reading List

First and foremost, I’d like to say that this post isn’t about painting Haiti as a picture of continued extreme turmoil, trouble and disaster. Haiti has such a beautifully rich and inspiring culture, but has been plagued with fits of corruption, natural disaster and political unrest through the country’s entire existence. Recently, Haiti has been… Continue Reading Understanding Haiti’s Past: A Reading List

Left of Black web series featuring LaKisha Simmons, author of Crescent City Girls: The Lives of Young Black Women in Segregated New Orleans

LaKisha Simmons, author of Crescent City Girls: The Lives of Young Black Women in Segregated New Orleans, was featured on John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute’s Left of Black web series. Left of Black is a web series featuring interviews with Black Studies scholars created and hosted by James B. Duke Distinguished Professor of African and African… Continue Reading Left of Black web series featuring LaKisha Simmons, author of Crescent City Girls: The Lives of Young Black Women in Segregated New Orleans

Tainted Tap: Preface

To spread awareness of National Water Quality Month, I decided to post an excerpt from one of the titles featured last week on our “Happy National Water Quality Month!” recommended reading list. This excerpt is from the Preface of Katrinell M. Davis’ Tainted Tap: Flint’s Journey from Crisis to Recovery. Assessing the challenges that community… Continue Reading Tainted Tap: Preface

The Center for the Study of Southern Culture SouthTalks series featuring B. Brian Foster, author of I Don’t Like the Blues: Race, Place, and the Backbeat of Black Life, and filmmaker Zaire Love

In April, The Center for the Study of Southern Culture hosted a talk between B. Brian Foster, author of I Don’t Like The Blues: Race, Black and Backbeat of Black Life, and award-winning filmmaker Zaire Love. Watch as they discuss the collaborative visual they created for Foster’s book, the many sides of black identity in Mississippi, the… Continue Reading The Center for the Study of Southern Culture SouthTalks series featuring B. Brian Foster, author of I Don’t Like the Blues: Race, Place, and the Backbeat of Black Life, and filmmaker Zaire Love

The Library Company of Philadelphia’s Fireside Chat with Crystal Lynn Webster, author of Beyond the Boundaries of Childhood: African American Children in the Antebellum North

Last week, The Library Company of Philadelphia hosted a Fireside Chat with Crystal Lynn Webster, author of Beyond the Boundaries of Childhood: African American Children in the Antebellum North. Drawing evidence from the urban centers of Boston, New York, and Philadelphia, Crystal Webster’s innovative research yields a powerful new history of African American childhood before… Continue Reading The Library Company of Philadelphia’s Fireside Chat with Crystal Lynn Webster, author of Beyond the Boundaries of Childhood: African American Children in the Antebellum North

“Half in Shadow: Black Women in Academia”, Charlotte Mecklenburg Library’s Conversation with UNC Press Author Dr. Shanna Greene Benjamin and Dr. Janaka Bowman Lewis

Hosted by Charlotte Mecklenburg Library, Dr. Shanna Greene Benjamin, author of Half In Shadow: The Life and Legacy of Nellie Y. McKay, and Dr. Janaka Bowman Lewis, discuss topics related to Benjamin’s book Half In Shadow. Watch below as Dr. Benjamin and Dr. Lewis examine academia’s relationship with black women, who Nellie Y. McKay is… Continue Reading “Half in Shadow: Black Women in Academia”, Charlotte Mecklenburg Library’s Conversation with UNC Press Author Dr. Shanna Greene Benjamin and Dr. Janaka Bowman Lewis

The Right to Live in Health: A Blessed Formula for Progress

Recently, we published a recommended reading list in support of Cuba’s most recent demand for liberation. Today we chose to publish an excerpt from one of the titles from that reading list, Daniel A. Rodríguez’s The Right to Live in Health: Medical Politics in Postindependence Havana. Out of the many reasons people in Cuba have… Continue Reading The Right to Live in Health: A Blessed Formula for Progress

Mount Vernon’s Virtual Book Talk with Author Tamika Nunley

Tamika Nunley, author of At the Threshold of Liberty: Women, Slavery, and Shifting Identities in Washington, D.C., was featured on Mount Vernon’s virtual book talk series earlier this year. During the talk, Tamika discusses her book, the portrait of Elizabeth Keckley used as the books cover, the tradition of education amongst enslaved people and even… Continue Reading Mount Vernon’s Virtual Book Talk with Author Tamika Nunley

Harriet, the Moses of Her People: Preface

In celebration of Disability Pride Month, I decided to post an excerpt from one of the titles from our recommended reading list published last week. This excerpt is the preface from Sarah Hopkins Bradford’s Harriet, the Moses of Her People. The title I have given my black heroine, in this second edition of her story,… Continue Reading Harriet, the Moses of Her People: Preface